WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Tue - 23.01.2018


BBC

Text: 

The BBC's announcement that it is to share video news with UK newspapers has been met with opposition by several media organisations. News International, the UK arm of News Corp, the Press Association and ITN have all expressed concern at the deal announced yesterday with the Daily Mail, the Guardian, the Independent and the Telegraph.

News International, which owns the Times, the Sun and the News of the World, said it had rejected the BBC's proposal to provide free online video content because of the "onerous marketing conditions" that promote the corporation, according to the Guardian. A spokeswoman said that the content would in effect not be provided at no cost because it would provide marketing for the BBC. The content would appear in a BBC-branded video player and links would lead back to the BBC's website.

"News International assessed the BBC's proposals and found that they not only impose onerous marketing conditions, but also offer little differentiation or benefit to customers of our websites," the Guardian reported the spokeswoman as saying. As well as providing marketing for the BBC, News International was concerned that the move "is likely to bring about a greater sameness of video content on a range of sites."

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multimedia/2009/07/bbcs_video_sharing_deal_met_with_opposit.php

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2009-07-29 11:25

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The BBC is to share video news with major British newspapers, in what the Guardian described as a "landmark deal." The first papers involved are the Daily Mail, the Guardian, the Independent and the Telegraph, but the publicly funded corporation plans to make the video news content available to other UK-based news websites also.

The BBC will provide a limited range of video news content in four public service areas: UK politics, business, health and science and technology. The material will be given to the papers at no cost and is intended to supplement their own work. According to the Guardian, the BBC has been clear that it has "no intention" of extending the range of content to genres such as entertainment and sports news.

There are conditions to use of the material: branded BBC content will appear in a branded video player, and there must be no advertising around the clips. It will be geo-blocked so that it can only be viewed in the UK.

"We regard this initiative as a core part of the BBC working more effectively as a public service partner, with other media organisations utilising BBC news content," Mark Byford, deputy director general and head of journalism at the BBC told the Guardian. "We hope this wider distribution will extend audience reach to BBC content. However, we are only providing material already produced on the BBC's news website and restricted to certain core public service genres."

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multimedia/2009/07/bbc_to_share_video_news_with_uk_newspape.php

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2009-07-28 10:16

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According to a recent national survey investigating the stength of consumer brands, the Times and the Sunday Times have been deemed the country's best-known newspaper brand. Overall, the papers came in at position 131 of the top 500 strongest consumer brands in the country.

The Superbrands annual findings come from a poll of more than 2000 citizens, conducted to ascertain which brands are the best known. The list offers an interesting insight into how newspaper and magazine brands are holding their weight in the consumer world alongside commercial giants such as Microsoft, Coca Cola and Rolex.

The most recognised publishing brand is apparently, National Geographic, which occupies the 123rd position. Other newspaper brands in the top 500 are: The Financial Times at 156, The Daily Telegraph at 395 and the Independent and the Independent on Sunday, which came in at 391.

The highest ranking magazine brands were Vogue (222), Which? magazine (256), the BBC's Radio Times (343) and the Economist (360).

Even though the BBC has been constantly in the public light this year due to a number of controversies and funding disputes, the brand slipped one position down to number 5. Microsoft retrieved the top spot from Google, which slid to third place.

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newspaper/2009/07/uk_the_times_and_sunday_times_brand_is_t.php

Author

Christie Silk

Date

2009-07-17 11:39

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An alternative vision to the controversial plans for the redistribution of broadcasting funds outlined in the Labour government's Digital Britain Report has been proposed by the Conservative party. The opposition party suggested that local newspaper companies should be responsible for the production of local television news programmes on the ITV channel.

The Conservatives would abandon the current government's plans to "top-slice" the BBC licensing fee from 2013. The surplus money would be redirected to the creation of a chain of independent consortia offering local news provision. Instead, the Conservatives would establish a group of roughly 80 independent local media companies. These companies would serve regional and local communities with print, television, radio and online news and entertainment.
The proposals, outlined by Johnston Press chairman Roger Parry, come as part of the Conservative's review of creative industries.

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multimedia/2009/07/uk_a_conservative_take_on_local_news_pro.php

Author

Christie Silk

Date

2009-07-15 16:59

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An opportunity for reinvention: from fortress to open house

According to Charlie Beckett (left), director of Polis, LSE's think tank on the role of media in society, in order to reinvent the content of journalism curricula and define the role of a journalist, journalism schools first need to determine what is meant by journalism. He said educators need to teach prospective journalists about the values of risk and experimentation and provide students with the ability to reconsider their idea of journalism. He also rejected the idea of labelling this approach as 'theory'. "It's not theory anymore," he said, "it's tomorrow's practice."

Notwithstanding a traditional journalism background (Beckett started as a local newspaper reporter and gradually worked his way through the ranks at the BBC and Channel 4), Beckett advocates throwing out the rule book on conventional journalism wisdom. He argues that too many journalism institutions have become fortresses, too set in their old ways, with a foundation that leaves little room for flexibility.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2009/06/the_future_of_journalism_education_confe_2.php

Author

Soraya Kishtwari

Date

2009-06-22 17:09

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Integrated journalists for integrated newsrooms

Almost everyone present agreed that journalism schools had a duty to train students across all media disciplines, with everyone having the opportunity to learn about print, web, video and audio platforms regardless if they were specialising in newspaper, broadcasting or online journalism.

As for content, the educators had differing views on the importance of choosing a specialist field, with some saying it was important to cater to the needs of the industry and the wider community. Recent outbreaks in bird and swine flu as well as the global downturn were cited as examples of areas where journalistic expertise was lacking, with Doreen Weisenhaus, associate professor at the Journalism and Media Studies Centre at the University of Hong Kong, saying there was a great need for health journalists, particularly in Asia, where bird flu was first detected. She also said that as a key financial hub, Asia was calling out for journalists trained in financial reporting. Others made similar points about science and business journalism.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2009/06/the_future_of_journalism_education_confe_1.php

Author

Soraya Kishtwari

Date

2009-06-22 15:23

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UK current affairs documentary series, Panorama, is tonight scheduled to air a programme entitled the "Death of Kiss and Tell", which looks at investigative journalism from both the side of newspapers and their subjects.

The BBC programme features Max Mosley, president of the Fédération International de l'Automobile. Last year, the News of the World revealed footage of the Formula One boss in a compromising situation with prostitutes. Despite the controversy that followed, the tabloid eventually lost a High Court battle to Mosley and was ordered to pay £60,000 in damages.

"At the moment the tabloid editor decides if he is going to destroy your life or not. And he thinks he should decide that," says Mosly speaking on the programme. He adds: "They've destroyed a family, ruined a life and done so simply to sell some of their newspapers. And I think that is utterly wrong."

Mosley believes that prison would be one way of deterring journalists from printing stories that could be damaging to an individual and his/her family.

Not everyone agrees, of course. Private Eye editor Ian Hislop warns against the perils of privacy laws, which he believes are being manipulated by a rich minority to protect themselves from the media spotlight. He tells Panorama: "If you're rich and powerful, privacy's the new libel, and much easier ... You don't have to prove it isn't true, you just have to prove that it's private by your definition."

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newspaper/2009/06/prison_for_journalists_who_violate_priva_1.php

Author

Soraya Kishtwari

Date

2009-06-15 18:20

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The BBC World Service's citizen journalism project, 'Your Story' has been axed due to lack of funding, reports journalism.co.uk.

"It's sad, but funding priorities make it so," said Nina Robinson, a senior broadcast journalist who headed the service.

'Your Story', in operation since June 2008, asked amateur contributors from around the world to put forward their ideas for news stories and features, as well as send in their own personal testimonies, photos, video and audio clips. Without funding, the programme could not continue to function in its role as a teacher in the citizen journalism trend, as individuals following their own research ideas were provided with equipment and training. Their work was then broadcasted on the World Service or put on to its online site.

Whilst circumstances have forced the closure of this one venture, the door has not been closed permanently to aspiring amateur journalists. Robinson plans to meet with the World Service commissioner, Anne Koch, "to discuss how we move forward with citizen content", in recognition that "most content is still coming in through the Have Your Say page on the BBC News site".

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multimedia/2009/05/bbc_world_service_cuts_funding_for_your.php

Author

Christie Silk

Date

2009-05-29 09:50

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Beamups, the digital marketplace for news footage goes live today with a UK version of the site.

The invention of two former cameramen, Boaz Eshtai and Yosi Romano, Beamups offers a platform for producers to distribute and sell their previously unused and archived material to would-be buyers.

The website first launched in the Middle East in April and, since then, has already helped to secure deals with the BBC, Al Jazeera, ABC and Rtvi.

Speaking with the Guardian's digital publishing correspondent, Jemima Kiss, a company spokeswoman said the site is intended as a business-to-business venture, although they have not ruled out the possibility of adding some amateur content. In any case, the company does not plan to operate in the same way as newswire service Demotix, which promotes the work of citizen journalists.

Every item sold on Beamups represents a 40% commission fee for the company - a typical figure within the industry, particularly for a B2B provider - and the seller gets to dictate the price. Buyers can choose from a variety of material and can opt to purchase footage outright or use it as a one-off. Like eBay, vendors set up their own "window" and, once a sale has been made, shoppers are invited to rate the service and quality of the content.

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multimedia/2009/05/beamups_up_and_running_in_the_uk.php

Author

Soraya Kishtwari

Date

2009-05-28 12:03

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UK-based PageSuite, a software development company which creates digital publications, has come up with a new software tool that will enable readers of newspapers on the web to search for key words and phrases. The search results appear instantly highlighted.

Currently, such a function is possible with the website versions of a newspaper, but few electronic titles offer the option. Outside the UK, El Paí­s' English-language version, produced in conjunction with the International Herald Tribune, is a good example of a newspaper e-edition where this service is already available.

UK online papers expected to benefit from the new software are likely to be those which already have an agreement with PageSuite. Following a two-year deal signed back in March, they include all the local and regional titles of the Johnston Press, comprising - among others - the Scotsman. PageSuite also powers all of the Newsquest and Archant-owned newspapers, as well as some from the Trinity Mirror group. PageSuite also counts the Examiner newspapers in Washington D.C. and San Francisco, as well as Illinois' Shaw Suburban Media group and military newspaper Stars and Stripes among its American customers.

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WEF URL: 
newspaper/2009/05/e-editions_of_newspapers_gain_new_search.php

Author

Soraya Kishtwari

Date

2009-05-28 10:39

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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