WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Tue - 23.01.2018


BBC

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A new initiative from the BBC will grant the general public access to online material used to train the industry's elite, with masterclasses delivered by the likes of John Simpson and John Humphrys, the Guardian reported.

The move comes as the international broadcasting agency launches the BBC Academy today, a centre dedicated to turning out the journalists of tomorrow.

Access to the website will be free to UK residents with television licences. Subscriptions will also be available to those wishing to access the material around the world. As a result, industry competitors will no doubt be keen to root through the website's content as soon as possible.

If this is worrying the BBC, then it hasn't let on. As part of the BBC's Charter agreement with the government, they are obligated to make an effort to train the broadcasting industry - yet appear happy to do so.

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multimedia/2009/12/sharpen_your_journalistic_skills_with_fr.php

Author

Helena Humphrey

Date

2009-12-14 12:41

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The BBC has announced today that it will not charge for online news, despite accusations from James Murdoch, son of media mogul Rupert Murdoch, that it is "throttling" the market and preventing competitors from expanding online.

Sir Michael Lyons, the BBC Trust chairman, said the corporation has "no intention of diluting BBC commitment to universal access to free news online," words likely to anger the News Corp CEO, who is at the forefront of plans to begin charging online.

Recently causing a stir with his accusations that the search engine Google, is 'stealing stories' through its news aggregaton service, Murdoch has threatened to remove his newspapers from Google's results. Eyebrows were raised yet again over the last few days with speculation that Murdoch might enter into an agreement with Microsoft's search engine Bing.

Lyons said today that the BBC Trust "recognises external concerns over scale and growth of BBC online operations". But he added: "Equally, it's an immensely popular service with audiences and an important tool for the economy."

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2009/11/bbc_wont_charge_online_says_lyons.php

Author

Jennifer Lush

Date

2009-11-24 16:07

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Search engine optimisation, the process of creating content for the web that will easily fall under the radar of search engines and therefore draw in more readers, has become an integral part of newsroom life. Many media outlets have been in on the act for a good few years, but only today has the BBC decided to latch on to this newsroom trend, increasing the length of its headlines on its news website, in the hope that this will generate more unique visitors to the site, the Guardian reported.

Many people may wonder why it has taken the BBC until now to join the media masses employing this technique - especially considering that the BBC receives an estimated 29% of its web traffic from search engines. One reason could be that some sceptics perceive SEO as a means to manipulate their stories and take away their true value. Yet Steve Hermann, editor of the BBC News, has defended the decision, calling it "an important area for us and for others across the web".

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Author

Helena Humphrey

Date

2009-11-20 16:35

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After announcing late last month that it would create the role of Social Media Editor, the BBC has appointed Alex Gubbay as the first to fill the position.

Currently the Interactive Sports News Editor for BBC Sport, Gubbay will commence his new title in January.

The creation of the position come amidst a wider general campaign run by the BBC to be more 'social media conscious' and Nic Newman, the BBC's future media and technology controller, journalism has previously said: "Like a lot of other news organisations, we are at the beginning of something very exciting."

"We recognise social media plays an important part. With the new position we are co-ordinating best practice. We think that the decision to appoint a social media editor is the best way to understand what works."

Gubbay's job will be to help navigate BBC journalists in their use of social media, rather than scan the various services for stories himself, as recently appointed 'Twitter correspondent' Ruth Barnett does for Sky News.

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Author

Jennifer Lush

Date

2009-11-17 14:18

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Following yesterday's announcement by Rupert Murdoch that he would be yanking all of his content off of Google search results, there has been an uproar of responses. Yet Murdoch also made another, more overlooked announcement in his interview with Sky News Australia- Murdoch plans to sue the BBC and other like companies for stealing content from News Corporation, Murdoch's company, reports the Guardian.

When asked how he would make his plan to charge for all of his news websites' work when other news organizations, such as the BBC, still provide content for free on their websites, Murdoch shot back that he would ensure that other companies stop using his content by suing them for copyright infringement. "If you look at them, most of their stuff is stolen from the newspapers now, and we'll be suing them for copyright," Murdoch is quoted as saying. "They will have to spend a lot more money on a lot more reporters to cover the world when they can't steal from newspapers."

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Author

Betsey Reinsborough

Date

2009-11-10 13:34

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The BBC is creating a new 'social media editor' position, the Guardian is reporting, amidst growing interest in the value of web services such as Twitter and Facebook to news publications. The BBC's decision comes as part of a wider campaign announced last month, designed to relaunch its websites with a greater social media focus.

"Like a lot of other news organisations, we are at the beginning of something very exciting, " said Nic Newman, the BBC's future media and technology controller, journalism. "We recognise social media plays an important part. With the new position we are co-ordinating best practice. We think that the decision to appoint a social media editor is the best way to understand what works."

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2009/10/bbc_to_appoint_social_media_editor.php

Author

Jennifer Lush

Date

2009-10-20 12:56

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Much commentary and debate has arisen surrounding BBC climate correspondent Paul Hudson's October 9 article entitled "What happened to global warming?" in which he stated that the warmest year recorded globally was 1998 and therefore suggested that climate change may not necessarily be caused by emissions of carbon dioxide, which have continued to increase since the late 90s.

Hudson outlined the arguments of climate change sceptics, who believe that natural cycles that humans do not influence are in fact responsible for how warm our planet is, such as solar output and ocean cycles. Some argue that we are now in fact in a period of global cooling, rather than warming.

The article is not entirely one-sided, including quotes from scientists who believe that climate change caused by humans is indeed a threat, but the reader is left with the impression that global warming might not exist and might well not be caused by humans. And this is what has attracted so much attention: it appears, as Telegraph writer and apparent climate change sceptic Damian Thompson wrote in a blog post, an "amazing U-turn on climate change," citing views that are often dismissed as minority.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2009/10/the_bbc_and_global_warming.php

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2009-10-19 12:24

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The BBC has released new draft editorial guidelines, which include some suggestions for online news as well as for its prolific television and radio output. For the first time, the BBC Trust - the body which aims to represent the public as owners of the corporation - has launched a public consultation on the revised draft, offering licence fee payers the chance to have their say on the standards, which are rewritten every five years.

The consultation period opened yesterday and continues until 24 December. An online survey offers ten questions on different areas of the new guidelines as well as a comment box. The BBC Trust says it will "look at all the information that we receive, including your answers and a range of other data. We will take the interests of both content producers, including programme makers, and audiences into account before finalising the new Editorial Guidelines." The completed set of standards will be published in summer 2010.

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multimedia/2009/10/bbcs_new_editorial_guidelines_tightening.php

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2009-10-08 15:00

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MediaGuardian reports its BBC sources claim various BBC sites will re-launch by March with a new look and emphasis on social media.

Anthony Rose, the BBC controller of Vision and Online, has not commented on any details for the new sites, besides confirming the big role of social networking media and redesigning the BBC homepage. However some new features were outlined, "Among them for example, is the plan to enable users to comment on particular moments while watching and see what other users said about the same moment or simply rate moments with 'Boo!', 'Good!' or 'Gosh!'" says Rose.

Integration with sites like Myspace and Facebook will allow users to create customized news and sharing feeds, while the overall navigation of the BBC news sites will be overhauled to emphasize that their 500+ stories a day are breaking news.

Source: MediaGuardian

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Author

Nestor Bailly

Date

2009-09-30 14:39

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James Murdoch, head of News International and son of media mogul Rupert, strongly criticised the BBC in his speech at MediaGuardian's Edinburgh International Television Festival on Friday and during a Q&A session the following day, calling for the corporation licence fee funding to be significantly reduced. His attack on the BBC was accompanied by extensive criticism of the way the British media industry is regulated.

Murdoch described the "chilling" hold that the BBC has over the media landscape, stressing that its news channels and website were inhibiting the ability of commercial competitors to invest in news and implying that it would put newspapers out of business. He emphasised the size and extent of the corporation, which publishes material that he thinks a state-supported institution should not, referring to "Orwellian" state control.

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2009-08-31 15:01

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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