WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 21.01.2018


BBC

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The BBC has confirmed it is to launch three iPhone applications from April 2010, with versions for the Blackberry and phones running Google's Android software becoming available soon thereafter. The announcement was made today at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. The apps will be free of charge and provide news and sport coverage from the BBC website, including audio and video elements.

The Guardian reports that the News app will be available from April and the Sport app in May. There will be UK and international versions of each.

Speaking at the conference, Erik Huggers, BBC director of future media and technology, said: "It's been 12 years since the launch of BBC Online, but as media converges and technology accelerates, licence fee payers are increasingly using sophisticated handheld devices to access information. They tell us that they want to access the digital services that they have paid for at a time and place that suits them."

Indeed it surely is high time for such a move, considering Sky News and the Telegraph have already launched theirs for free, as well as international BBC rival, CNN. Unauthorised BBC apps and apps using BBC content are popular and have been available for quite some time.

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Author

Helena Humphrey

Date

2010-02-17 18:48

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Many journalists have been denied visas for Iran in the lead-up to the Islamic Revolution anniversary celebrations, and those in Iran have been told not to report on opposition protests, The Guardian reports.

The internet and phones have been interfered with and the few foreign correspondents in Iran operate under tight restrictions. Although the Iranian government says that over 200 foreign journalists have been approved to cover the event, this consisted of government minders escorting them to the official rally at Tehran's Azadi square. Exiled Iranian journalists warned their colleagues not to go.
Sixty-five Iranian journalists are in detention, according to Reporters Without Borders, and Iran has become the leading jailer of journalists in the world, according to the International Press Institute (IPI).

Official media in Iran have not offered a wide angle on the story, The Guardian says, citing a report on English-language Press TV: "Every year I tell you that it's very glamorous, it's very exciting, it's very impressive," said correspondent Gisoo Ahmadi.

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Author

Elizabeth Redman

Date

2010-02-12 12:16

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BBC journalists have been told to use social media as a primary source of information and to become more collaborative in producing stories, The Guardian reports.

The new director of BBC Global News, Peter Horrocks, said that editorial staff should make better use of social media. "This isn't just a kind of fad from someone who's an enthusiast of technology," he told the BBC in-house weekly Ariel. "I'm afraid you're not doing your job if you can't do those things. It's not discretionary."
He said that technology was changing journalism and that it was important for the BBC to adapt. Twitter and RSS readers are to become essential tools, he added. BBC journalists should aggregate and curate content with attribution, and pay attention to feedback that shows how the audience relates to the broadcaster.

The BBC appointed its first social media editor in November, but has otherwise taken a cautious approach to the use of social media, according to The Guardian. In its 2009 editorial guidelines, a 160-page document, social media are mentioned only once, in a warning to editors to "consider the impact of our re-use" of social media content.

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Author

Elizabeth Redman

Date

2010-02-10 19:10

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The BBC will not try to compete with local publishers, according to director of BBC news Helen Boaden, MediaWeek reported.
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Speaking at the Oxford Media Convention, Boaden said that BBC websites would not become more localised in the future.

"The BBC's 45 websites are devoted to big cities and counties," she said. "In contrast, the Newspaper Society says there are 1,500 local newspaper websites. Some of which are local, some are hyper-local. The BBC is not competing for audience in the same space."

Plans for a series of BBC local websites with video content were rejected in November 2008 by the BBC Trust, the regulatory body of the BBC. Politicians and industry opposed the plan, concerned about the adverse impact on a sector suffering falls in circulation and advertising.

The corporation is interested in exploring other partnerships, she said, without providing any details.

Sly Bailey, chief executive of publisher Trinity Mirror, said at the conference that she was "cheered" by Boaden's remarks. Yet she warned that local council newspapers and magazines, which have come under fire this week for their impact on the commercial local press, "must be stopped".

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Author

Elizabeth Redman

Date

2010-01-22 18:01

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"Blogging is the biggest change to BBC journalism", Kevin Marsh, the head of the corporation's College of Journalism, said at the Journalism rewired conference. He added that blogging by senior figures like Robert Peston and Nick Robinson has helped to fundamentally change the way BBC delivers its news.

Kevin Marsh told conference attendees that in the last couple of years, the BBC had shifted its news focus away from its traditional TV bulletins, adopting a "live and continuous" model centered on multimedia content on the web, according to the PressGazette.
In April 2008, the BBC moved its news operation to a multimedia newsroom, and with the rising importance of the blog, big-name journalists, like business editor Peston and political editor, Robinson were now willing to break stories on their blogs rather than just on flagship TV bulletins.

Marsh cites Peston's choice of breaking the news of Northern Rock's emergency loan application to the Bank of England back in 2007 through his BBC blog, as an example of the importance blogs have gained in the last couple of years.

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Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-01-15 14:12

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A number of proposals to 'shore up' science journalism were set out today in a UK government-commissioned report titled "Science and the Media: Securing the Future", according to an article on the PressGazette.

One key proposal is to appoint a national training officer to teach basic science reporting to non-specialist journalists. The Royal Statistical Society has already agreed to create the post of National Coordinator for Science Journalism and Training, subject to funding. Whoever holds this post in the future will be responsible for coordinating the training of editors and non-specialist reporters throughout the media, as well as trainee journalists at universities.

Other recommendations include the creation of a Science Programming Center to assist collaboration between scientists and program makers, a new scheme that aims to increase the amount of training science press officers receive, as well as the number of people with scientific backgrounds working in journalism.

Fiona Fox, who chaired The Science and Media Expert Group that produced these recommendations, urged the Government to set up a National Commission on the Future of Journalism, stressing the need for Government to engage more in the wider crisis in journalism.

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Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-01-14 14:59

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Iranians have been forbidden to talk to or receive aid from more than 60 international organisations, including thinktanks, universities and broadcasters, The Guardian has reported.

The BBC, which last year launched a Farsi television channel, and Wilton Park, a British group that organises foreign policy conferences, are among those blacklisted. Two U.S. government-funded Farsi-language outlets, Voice of America and Radio Farda, have also been banned, as have Yale University and American thinktanks the Brookings Institution and the George Soros Open Society Foundation.

Iranian reformist website Rah-e Sabz is on the list as well. This is a blow for the international media, which have been using it as a news source during the recent unrest while restricted from covering events.

There have previously been cases of Iranians being arrested or harassed for contact with some of the banned organisations but there has never been an extensive formal list.

According to reports, an unnamed minister for foreign affairs called the ban a response to a western policy of undermining the Islamic system by reaching out to influential groups such as experts and academics.

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Author

Elizabeth Redman

Date

2010-01-06 18:28

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The BBC chose to settle the libel action taken against it by British-based oil company Trafigura yesterday, after the broadcaster agree to apologise for its Newsnight program, pay £25,000 to charity, and withdraw any allegation that Trafigura's toxic waste dumped in Africa had caused deaths.

A resolution in the High Court had been expected yesterday with a hearing for the case scheduled in the morning. BBC lawyers, however, engaged in a mediation process with Trafigura director Eric de Turckheim and Carter-Ruck, Trafigura's law firm and the matter was resolved out of court.

The Guardian reports that the decision to negotiate came as the BBC realised their report had could have been misleading and that the potential legal bill if the case went to trial could amount to some £3 million. Trafigura had brought the libel action against a single aspect of Newsnight's reporting, that the toxic waste dumping had prompted deaths, not just illness. In a statement before Justice Eady at the High Court the BBC said: "Experts in the [compensation] case were not able to establish a link between the waste and serious long-term consequences, including deaths."

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Author

Jennifer Lush

Date

2009-12-18 13:42

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A verdict in the High Court is expected today on the libel action brought against the BBC by British-based oil traders Trafigura, reports the Guardian. The hearing for the case is scheduled before Mr Justice Eady this morning and BBC lawyers are reported to have been engaged in a mediation process with Carter-Ruck, Trafigura's law firm.

In May earlier this year, Trafigura's lawyers announced that they had brought libel proceedings against the BBC over its BBC Newsnight broadcast on Trafigura, which accused the company of a toxic waste dumping scandal in Abidjan in the Ivory Coast. The report claimed the dumping has made several people in the area ill, even causing deaths.

The libel action was taken on the latter point- that the oil traders had been wrongly accused of causing deaths, (they acknowledge causing sickness), despite the fact that official statements by a UN investigator, the Ivory Coast government and the British government referred to deaths directly related to the dumping in Abidjan.

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Author

Jennifer Lush

Date

2009-12-17 12:50

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The BBC, who yesterday announced a new initiative to grant the general public access to professional media training resources, has also revealed it will expand the content available on its news website by linking to rival sources via an aggregation-like system, reports The Independent.

The move comes after accusations headed by News Corp's chairman and CEO for Europe and Asia, James Murdoch, that the corporation, in choosing to remain free, is flooding the market and preventing competitors from expanding online and charging for their content. The new plan would reportedly see links to commerical websites added at the end of BBC stories.

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Author

Jennifer Lush

Date

2009-12-15 13:05

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