WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 31.08.2014


BBC

The trip was advertised on a student group website as an educative “week of sight seeing, meeting with ministers, [and] government officials,” The New York Times reported, but the students ran the risk of arrest and incarceration were the filming discovered.

“For us, this is a matter of student welfare — students were lied to, they weren’t able to give their consent,” Alex Peters-Day, general secretary of the LSE’s student union, told the BBC. She added: “They’ve used students essentially as a human shield in this situation.”

Students knew they would be accompanied by a journalist, but they were not aware that investigative reporter John Sweeney, his wife and a cameraman had orchestrated the trip to film a documentary, LSE Director Craig Calhoun wrote. Sweeney, who graduated from the LSE in 1980, allowed North Korean guides to call him “professor,” according to The New York Times.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-15 16:21

In an email to BBC staff, Hall outlined key challenges and said he hopes to “win back trust” for the corporation.

"In the coming weeks, I will set out how we can all shape the next chapter for the BBC as we move towards our centenary in 2022," said Hall.

His appointment as director-general is not the first time Hall has worked for the BBC. He was the head of news and current affairs from 1996 to 2001, and oversaw the launch of Radio 5 live, BBC News 24, the BBC News website and BBC Parliament.

Hall comes in at a crucial time for the BBC. Former Director George Entwistle held the position for only 54 days, resigning after the Jimmy Savile and Lord McAlpine child abuse scandals. One of Hall's first tasks will be to appoint a new director of news and a director of television.

The BBC reports that “the news role is particularly important following the handling of the two Newsnight crises - one over the failure to broadcast the original investigation into allegations against Jimmy Savile and the subsequent programme that led Lord McAlpine to be wrongly implicated in claims of child abuse.”

Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-04-03 15:42

Updated 2 April to include interview with Burt Herman.

Storify recently answered the ongoing question of how the site would monetize its social media curation and story platform: Storify VIP, a subscription service that allows publishers to unlock advanced features.

"Many major media organizations, brands and non-profit groups users have come to Storify organically for its basic functionality," Co-founder Burt Herman said. "But it's been clear for a while that our professional users had these needs and we've been thinking about how to serve them, which is why we're launching this service now."

Created in 2011, Storify says its new service will allow clients — media, publishers “or anyone seeking to deeply integrate social curation and storytelling into their site” — to customize embedding of Storify features and easily update creations in real-time. Clients will also get “priority” technical support, the ability to share stories internally within their companies and integrate custom content into Storify pieces.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-29 16:30

“This is not about getting the right women on air,” said Tim Davie, acting BBC Director General. “This is about getting the right people on air.”

Studies have shown that male experts are four times more likely to appear on radio and TV than females, but the BBC has been known for male-dominated programs including Radio 4’s Today, on which men are featured at a six to one ratio to women, The Telegraph reported. Last year Culture Secretary Ed Vaizey likened the program a “terrible cliched locker room.”

In fact, on July 5, 2011, “you had to wait from 6.15 am until 8.20 am to hear the one female contributor who appeared alongside the 27 male contributors on programme,” Kira Cochrane reported. She found that 83.5 percent of Today’s contributors were male at the time of her study in 2011.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-26 18:06

The latest dramatic twist in the BBC saga has seen the new director general resign and other senior staff step aside. What might be surprising is that it was not the now notorious Jimmy Savile case that actually brought them down, but the misidentification of a child abuser as a former prominent conservative politician.

BBC DG George Entwistle resigned on Saturday after it was confirmed that the BBC’s flagship news programme Newsnight had incorrectly implicated Lord McAlpine, a former Tory treasurer, in a story about paedophilia. 

There has been considerable criticism of Entwistle's £450,000 pay off (a year’s salary) from members of parliament and the National Audit Office is due to look into the justification for the sum.

Tim Davie, who was director of audio and music, has stepped in as acting director general and has pledged to “get a grip” on the news operation and its journalism. It seems clear that Davie is a temporary solution, as BBC chairman Lord Patten is actively seeking candidates, the Guardian reported yesterday.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-11-12 20:12

Though recent events may suggest otherwise, the British royal family aren’t fans of baring all. A constitutional monarch, the Queen refrains from publicly voicing her opinion on decisions taken by the governments formed in her name or on political issues of national and international significance.

Royal protocol dictates that conversations conducted in a private setting between the Queen and journalists are treated as being strictly off the record. Decades, centuries even, of adhering to this convention meant that BBC correspondent Frank Gardner’s decision to report details of a private conversation he’d had with the Queen took the nation by surprise.

Discussing the extradition of Abu Hamza on BBC Radio 4’s Today Programme, the respected security journalist revealed: “the Queen was pretty upset […] that there was no way to arrest him [Hamza]. She couldn’t understand why, there must surely have been some law that he had broken. Well in the end sure enough there was.” Pressed by a clearly stunned James Naughtie, Gardner went on to disclose that the Queen has raised the matter with the Home Secretary at the time.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-26 17:57

The Guardian wants to aggregate the web’s best journalism, and it wants your help,” begins Mashable’s Lauren Indvik as she reports on the newspaper’s plans to launch a “pop-up aggregator” today. The way to participate? Tweet great commentary and analysis on trending stories with the hashtag #smarttakes.

A court order has banned the BBC from broadcasting a docu-drama about last year’s London riots, the Guardian reports, and the broadcaster's lawyers are considering making a formal appeal.

The digital news payments kiosk Piano Media through which numerous Slovenian and Slovakian publishers charge for content has announced that seven publishers in Poland (who are together behind 26 national and regional newspapers, 42 websites and 11 magazines) will adopt a joint subscription system in September, Journalism.co.uk and PaidContent report.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-18 18:32

It is a truth universally lamented in the news industry, but no one can deny the fact that sales of printed newspapers are declining, with digital formats moving in to fill the space. If the younger generation, like their parents, begin reading news from online sources, where does that leave the future of print?

As inma.org reported, one Austrian newspaper, Kleine Zeitung, has seen this forthcoming challenge and launched a pre-emptive strike: they have launched Kleine Kinderzeitung, a newspaper specifically designed for children.

There are already some very successful models for engaging children in current affairs and news in general. Take for instance the long-running BBC institution that is Newsround. The program was first broadcast in 1972, initially known as 'John Craven's Newsround', after its longstanding presenter and editor, the show continues to be aired today.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-07-27 13:40

Radio used to be the most immediate method of accessing news information and to many it remains an indispensable means of obtaining news. But how can radio maintain its position as a valuable and relevant medium when digital media offer effective, instantaneous methods of communicating using a combination of text, video and audio?

The answer, many would argue, is 'visualisation'. Essentially, this is a process of filming what is actually happening in a studio and broadcasting it via the web. Why do this? What is the difference between visualisation and television?

However, the effect that visualisation achieves is quite different, as explained on the BBC College of Journalism Blog. Visualisation shows the radio studio as a working environment, where interviews are held, where music is performed and where news is reported. It is very much unlike watching interview or performances in the highly engineered context of a pre-recorded television show, for instance. The attraction with visualisation is occupying the privileged position of 'fly on the wall', seeing the internal workings of a radio studio, which traditionally remains closed to the eyes of the public.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-07-19 17:30

Major news organisations have begun to embrace social media as part of their operations, acknowledging its potential as both a newsgathering tool and news outlet. But more and more news organisations are also setting boundaries for the use of social media, hoping in this way to prevent any missteps that could undermine their staffers' - or worse, the organisation's - reputation.

As a revered media giant, the BBC's social media efforts are under particular scrutiny. The British broadcaster released yesterday its updated social media guidelines.

In sum, the guidelines are in line with BBC's earlier social media policies and, according to the guidelines, can be summarised as 'don't do anything stupid'. "Most of the points do seem like common sense, but by formalizing these, BBC is minimizing the chances of a major social media faux-pas taking place", said TNW UK.

According to the BBC's The Editors blog, the guidelines consist more of "suggestions, reminders, best practice and housekeeping" than restrictive rules. The blog notes the crucial role social media "plays in breaking down barriers to engagement, opening up newsgathering networks, and as an outlet for journalism".

Author

Teemu Henriksson's picture

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-07-15 17:41

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