WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

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Mon - 23.10.2017


Associated Press

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In the age of social media, scoops can last just a matter of seconds. As New York Times interactive editor Aron Pilhofer noted in a session on moving towards smarter, better online content, gone are the days when competitors would have to wait 24 hours to take your scoop. Now, he said, it’s almost irrelevant to be first, and the value of being right outweighs the value of being first by magnitudes.

It’s not just traditional news organizations who feel this way. Adam Baker, founder of citizen journalism site Blottr, said that his team can’t afford to get anything wrong, because they don’t have the reputation of an established brand.

Most normal people don’t even know who broke a story, said Anthony De Rosa, Reuters’ social media editor, in a session on citizen journalism. Eric Carvin, social media editor at the Associated Press, suggested that scoops are becoming less relevant, with great investigative pieces becoming more important. Pilhofer made a similar point, commenting that any blog could cut and summarise a breaking news article, but a piece like Snowfall will always be unique to The Times.

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-04-29 18:26

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Around 1 p.m. EST yesterday, panic spread after the Associated Press (AP) Twitter account announced that US President Barack Obama had been wounded from a series of explosions at the White House. Minutes later, the AP revealed that their account had been hacked.

With 1.9 million followers, the concession of retweets spread like wildfire, reaching the stock market where the Dow lost 130 points within a few minutes before returning to it original level.

The fake tweet read: “Breaking: Two Explosions in the White House and Barack Obama is injured.”

The AP quickly announced that their account had been hacked and was suspended yesterday. Following the incident, an FBI investigation is under way. An AP staffer said on his Twitter account that the attack came shortly after a number of AP employees had received a phishing email.

Hacking can have strong implications for a venerable publication like the AP.

“A media publisher conceivably could be sued for negligence if things are published under their name that is not true and if they didn’t take reasonable steps to prevent the erroneous publication of information,” said Nick Economidis to Bloomberg.

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Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-04-24 16:36

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Kathleen Carroll, AP Senior Vice President, announced on Tuesday that the term ‘illegal immigrant’ would not be used anymore, calling it a "label." She noted that the AP prefers to label "behavior" rather than "people," writing that instead of using the term "schizophrenic," the AP now prefers saying that one is "diagnosed with schizophrenia." The new AP entry still categorizes illegal immigration, but recommends to avoid using "undocumented immigrant" or an alternative descriptor like "unauthorized" in place of "illegal immigrant."

"Acceptable variations include living in or entering a country illegally or without legal permission," the AP's StyleBook suggests.

The San Antonio Express-News stopped using the term five years ago, and in 2010, the paper stopped using “immigrant” with a modifier altogether, Poynter reported. Rather, the paper would state that somebody had entered the US illegally, and cite a source.

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Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-04-04 15:06

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If you thought photo-sharing app Instagram was little more than a platform for rich kids to post photos of their luxury yachts, think again. Journalists and news organisations are increasingly using the social networking application, bought for $1 billion in April of this year by Facebook, as a tool for reporting on news and events.

NPR, NBC, The New York TimesThe New YorkerWSJ and The Washington Post are just some of the major news outlets that are seeking to harness the opportunities provided by Instagram’s blend of social interaction and content creation. Only last week photojournalists covering the 2012 presidential election for the AP were asked by the organisation to use their personal Instagram feeds in a professional capacity:#aponthetrail is designed to give the public an intimate insight into elements of the U.S presidential campaign that often go unreported.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-04 18:34

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The Associated Press announced today that Gary Pruitt, the chairman, president and CEO of The McClatchy Co., will become its newest chief executive officer in July, succeeding current President and CEO Tom Curley upon his retirement, The New York Times Media Decoder blog reported.

McClatchy owns 30 daily papers and is the third largest US newspaper publisher. Pruitt will be succeeded by Pat Talamantes as the new CEO of McClatchy and by Kevin McClatchy as chairman, the article said.

Pruitt, who spent 28 years at McClatchy, is no stranger to the AP, serving on its Board of Directors for nine years, according to an AP press release. He also formerly served as a chair of the Newspaper Association of America.

In the press release, Pruitt praised Curley’s tenure as chief executive, as well as the digital direction the AP has embraced in recent years.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-22 15:45

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Today the Associated Press opened the first fully-operated news bureau in North Korea from a Western news organisation, a press release announced. The international news wire's office in Pyongyang will be the first to offer, with a full-time staff, a video and text coverage from the country. The plan to open the bureau was announced last June.

According to the Guardian, the opening arrives after months of discussions with the Korea Central News Agency, inside which the new office will be based, and it was originally planned to open last December but it has been postponed after the death of leader Kim Jong-il.

The agency already had a video office in North Korea six years ago through its London-based Associated Press Television News (APTN) and it has been the only independent foreign media news agency operating in North Korea till now, as reported on the APTN website.

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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-01-16 18:06

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The Associated Press has gone a step further in its social media strategy: Eric Carvin, an AP Nerve Center news producer and former National Desk editor, has been named the organization's social media editor, a press release announced.

Carvin, who has spent the past two years overseeing social media efforts at the news wire, engaging with readers and gathering user-generated content, "will work to ensure that social media becomes an integral part of every AP journalist's skills".

"This is a crucial role, based within the Nerve Center [the central editorial desk at AP's headquarters,] but one that will depend on daily interaction - strategizing, training and firefighting - with all the regions, verticals and formats", wrote AP deputy managing editor Tamer Fakahany in a memo reported by Jim Romenesko.

(Incidentally, Eric Carvin's brother is NPR social media desk senior strategist Andrew Carvin.)

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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-01-05 18:15

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The Associated Press has announced the release of its automated style-checking software, AP StyleGuard. For the APs online subscribers, the AP StyleGuard plug-in, developed by Equiom Linguistic Labs, has been available for download since December 16.

The programme acts as a proof reading tool, much like Microsoft Office spell check, and tells journalists when they their writing departs from the stylistic rules dictated by the AP Style Guide. Bassam Saliba, co-founder of Equiom Linguistic Labs, said "We developed AP StyleGuard as a Microsoft Office enhancement, by integrating AP Stylebook to allow authors to interactively validate the quality and consistency of news articles, press releases and documents". The program has taken more than a year to develop and is currently in the beta phase of development, available only for Microsoft operating systems.

Colleen Newvine, product manager for AP Stylebook, told WAN-IFRA all about the motivations for creating the product, the impact the software will have on journalists and the future of AP StyleGuard.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-12-19 17:46

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The Associated Press has joined forces with the National Sports Content Sharing Network (NSCSN), allowing the members of the NSCSN to share content via the AP's distribution platform as Nieman Lab reports.

The NSCSN allows sports writers to exchange content for free: the network is co-operative and so writers can contribute their own material to the pool and use the work of others in return. The network came about as a result of the split between the AP and eight Ohio-based newspapers, which decided in 2008 to set up their own cooperative newswire instead of using AP services.

The NSCSN followed this lead and decided to build on the common practice of swapping and sharing information between sports desks in order create a kind of swap-shop for sports content, ie a newswire that would not charge for use of its content.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-12-07 15:22

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The Associate Press caused a stir in the media community when it scolded employees on Wednesday for having tweeted abut the arrests of one AP staffer and photojournalist at the Occupy Wall Street protest in Zuccotti Park, New York - before the news reached the official AP news wire.

Staff were told in a high priority memo which, according to NYMag, said "we've had a breakdown in staff sticking to policies around social media and everyone needs to get with their folks now to tell them to knock it off".

The AP's social media handbook, which acts an employee's bible for the use of Twitter and Facebook, is very clear that journalists should not 'scoop the wire', so to speak.

This type of social media restriction is common practice for major news wires, Reuters also has a similar guidelines. From a business perspective, it makes sense to stop employees beating the wire - what good is a news wire if the information on it is old news?

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-18 13:45

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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