WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Mon - 22.09.2014


apple

The Summly (n. “summarized version of a news article optimized for iPhone”) might look something like this: On his 17th birthday last Thursday, Nick D’Aloisio (pictured) and his dozen-strong team relaunched Summly, an iPhone app that uses natural language processing and “rocket science” to automatically summarize the news into mobile-friendly, 350-500 character bites. In essence, the app aims to help you cut through the deluge of “drivel” that inundates the newsosphere, with as much style as Arne Jacobson’s Egg Chair – the company’s logo.

“It’s a representation of the egg chair, not the exact egg chair,” specified D’Alosio in a telephone interview with Editors Weblog this afternoon. “The idea is that chairs themselves are kind of synonymous with sitting down, relaxing and reading news, so we decided to take the concept and [give it] a slight twist, with a really modernist approach and minimalist user interface,” he said, pointing out the two S’s that lurk in the symbol.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-11-05 19:34

Dear Mario,

Reading your blog today (garciamedia.com), I spotted a June post I had missed: what your dream tablet conference in 2012 would look like. We have just finished the programming for the coming 5th Tablet and Apps Summit (October 30 in Frankfurt).

So I ran a checklist hoping you might agree with our topics and take “your dancing shoes” to our summit…

- We seem to agree that it’s necessary to “Rethink Media Apps on Mobile and Tablets”. What you call the next generation of news apps.

- We did not call it an iPad conference. The iPad is still the best. Our speakers from Stern magazine and GQ magazine will probably be with you on that. But from a publisher’s point of view, you need to stimulate the competition. So we have invited a Microsoft evangelist and two European publishers who have started to explore Windows 8 possibilities and tablets.

- We are looking at the wider meaning of mobile platforms. You would probably not recommend that. But we do think it’s important to understand usage in order to better serve tablets AND smartphones.

- We focus on two things that are of importance to you:

Author

Valérie Arnould's picture

Valérie Arnould

Date

2012-10-03 10:56

Amazon’s first Kindle Fire, which journalists positioned as a potential rival to the iPad’s throne when it came out last November, “never really, well, caught fire,” as Wired's Christina Bonnington puts it. Nevertheless, 10 months after its release, the original full-colour, 7-inch touch-screen tablet has sold out, and Amazon has captured 22 percent of the U.S. tablet market, regaining the position it first won in December of last year as the second-strongest tablet brand in the United States.

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced this triumphant statistic yesterday, in what has been called an Apple-like event at a hangar in Santa Monica, California, where he announced the newest additions to the Kindle line.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-07 14:14

The first noticeable aspect of the release of Apple’s new iPad, announced yesterday at a launch event in San Francisco, is the fact that it’s called just that: “the new iPad,” rather than the iPad 3 or iPad HD. Why this is, is unclear – is it not sufficiently different to be an iPad3? Or has a decision on a name just not been taken?

The new device, to go on sale on March 16, has:

  • a ‘retina display’ of the type seen on the iPhone 4. For the iPad this means 3.1m pixels, 2048 x 1536 – double the resolution of previous versions.
  • a dual-core ‘A5X’ chip with quad-core graphics
  • 4G/LTE wireless, which is much faster than 3G but currently only available in the US
  • an upgraded iSight camera which has a 5 megapixel sensor and HD video recording capability.
  • voice dictation (in English, French, German and Japanese)
  • updated iWork applications, and iPhoto with more advanced editing options

It does not have haptic feedback, as commentators had predicted, notes the Guardian, or anything in particular that seems to justify the emphasis put on ‘touch’ in the invitation to the event.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-03-08 15:17

Apple's new Siri voice technology might have an impact on news consumption, Patrick Thornton wrote recently on Poynter.

Siri is type of voice technology featured in the iPhone 4S and its peculiarity is that, unlike older systems, it uses natural language processing. That means - the article explains - that instead of having to ask a precise question, users can formulate their queries in different ways and Siri is able to get the answer anyway.

"Rather than remembering strict commands, the language recognition allows us to speak the way we think without hesitation or frequent errors", explains Marco Arment, creator of iOS app Instapaper and former lead developer of Tumblr, quoted in the article.

So far Apple doesn't allow third-party apps to use the technology which is available only for built-in apps on the iPhone 4S but as the article says, this could change soon.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-02-15 18:37

This is a big week for Flipboard. After launching in China on Monday, today the social news reader app has finally released a version for the iPhone.

The new iPhone app does just what Flipboard on the iPad did; collect stories from social media accounts as well as other sources and present them to readers in a visually pleasing format.

But there are significant differences. For one thing, the iPhone app works by swiping up and down, rather than the old format of turning pages from right to left. More importantly, the phone app introduces "cover stories". This new section learns from your interaction with content so that it can deliver stories that are most interesting and relevant to you.

The differences are part of a drive to distinguish between the lean-back platform of the iPad, which most people use before bed, and the lean-forward platform of the iPhone, which users are more likely to access on the go or standing in queues.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-12-07 16:25

The Russian daily Rossiyskaya Gazeta has created an iPad app, Touch Russia, for its English-language Russia Beyond the Headlines (RBTH) initiative, as The Editors Weblog recently reported.

Olga Ivanova, Mobile Projects Director for RBTH took the time to talk to us about the changing Russian media landscape, the challenges of making an app for the international market and the global reaction to the Touch Russia app.

Russian media is not the most responsive of sectors in the industry; the "Russian media are generally a year, sometimes two years behind world media trends, especially when it comes to digital," Ivanova told WAN-IFRA.

Across the globe, the problem of developing a successful payment model in the digital age has lead firms to hesitate before plunging into the digital market - Russia is no exception to this trend: "Most brands are afraid to invest in mobile and develop expensive sophisticated apps because it is not clear how to monetize those products, especially in Russian economy. But I feel that everyone understands the importance of being on mobile platforms and expanding digital presence, " Ivanova explained.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-12-06 17:34

Taking a bite of the Apple... Are there more rewards or dangers?

Apple certainly has a lot of offer new publishers, as Editor & Publisher notes in an article published today about Apple Newsstand.

The article by Tim Sohn reports that newspaper publishers are "raving" about the new portal, launched in October this year, which has given app download numbers a huge boost. According to Sohn, The New York Times has experienced a 429% increase in iPad app downloads and a 5,596% increase in iPhone app downloads since becoming part of Newsstand. The Metro UK app, available on Newsstand, has been downloaded 180,000 times since October 31, compared to an earlier app that was not part of Newsstand, which has been downloaded just 240,000 times since its launch in April 2010. The new app has also generated over 65,000 unique daily visitors and between 800,000 and 1 million page views for Metro UK's website.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-12-05 17:58

Apple's latest launch event was definitely disappointing for those Apple fans awaiting the elusive beast that is the iPhone 5 - but that doesn't mean that the tech giant's latest announcement, the iPhone 4S, was insignificant, as Mashable explains here.

The recent launch of lower price products, such as the Amazon Kindle Fire, which may prove a serious competitor to the iPad, and Aakash, the US-Indian produced tablet that will be sold to students in India for around $35, has prompted questions about whether Apple can maintain its position as tech-brand supreme. Will the iPhone 4S help in this mission?

Relevant developments for publishers include the fact that the device is more closely integrated with Twitter than ever before and also provides an offline reading mode in its Safari browser- something which may cause annoyance to publishers who rely on online advertising revenues. Newsstand - the cunningly named digital newsstand from Apple - will also be an integral part of the device.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-05 19:12

The whole world is talking about the new Kindle tablet as if it were the greatest thing since the discovery of... well, fire.

The television ad certainly tries to sell the Kindle Fire as if it were the most revolutionary object since the printing press - there's even a Voltaire reference thrown in there for good measure. Despite the wealth of press attention heaped upon the release of the Kindle Fire, journalists and publishers still have some questions that need answering: primarily, how will the Kindle Fire change the way we do business?

Poynter offers a great run down of the grey areas and speculation that come when considering a new tablet format, but for many commentators and analysts, there is no doubt: the Kindle Fire is going to shake up the tablet market.

Why so sure? Why will Amazon succeed where the likes of the RIM and its BlackBerry PlayBook have not (yet)?

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-09-29 13:50

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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