WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Wed - 23.07.2014


app

The Summly (n. “summarized version of a news article optimized for iPhone”) might look something like this: On his 17th birthday last Thursday, Nick D’Aloisio (pictured) and his dozen-strong team relaunched Summly, an iPhone app that uses natural language processing and “rocket science” to automatically summarize the news into mobile-friendly, 350-500 character bites. In essence, the app aims to help you cut through the deluge of “drivel” that inundates the newsosphere, with as much style as Arne Jacobson’s Egg Chair – the company’s logo.

“It’s a representation of the egg chair, not the exact egg chair,” specified D’Alosio in a telephone interview with Editors Weblog this afternoon. “The idea is that chairs themselves are kind of synonymous with sitting down, relaxing and reading news, so we decided to take the concept and [give it] a slight twist, with a really modernist approach and minimalist user interface,” he said, pointing out the two S’s that lurk in the symbol.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-11-05 19:34

“Get the wider story”, says the new photography iPad app that Reuters launched last week.

Aiming to re-imagine the way news photography can engage its audience on a multimedia platform, The Wider Image app offers the public a selection of the best photos gathered by the news agency's vast network of photographers around the world.

The Wider Image takes advantage of new storytelling possibilities on the iPad.

Stories are a swirl of photos, narrative slideshows, interactive sequences, testmonies by photographers, expanded fact boxes and data charts and locations viewed on a world map. The Wider Image has been launched with over 100 stories and 50 in-depth photographer profiles, with more to be added regularly.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-10-25 17:11

French aggregation startup Youmag is seeking to integrate free and paid digital news content in a made-to-measure, virtual magazine format.

Co-founders Antoine Levêque, Nicolas Schaettel and Guillaume Multrier have recently unveiled versions for the web and Android, and Youmag’s free iPhone and iPad apps, launched this past June, were downloaded over 100,000 times in two months.

The concept is simple: personalised aggregation + curation and editorial intervention by a small team of journalists + a freemium model akin to that of music streaming platform Spotify = ideally, a successful company that generates 2/3 of its revenue from advertising, and 1/3 from happy readers inclined to pay for premium content (thereby making publishers happy, too).

Personalised, nuanced aggregation

Let’s say that you are the user. After logging in for the first time, you are invited to select the sections of your magazine from a carousel of themes and sub-themes.

“What really distinguishes us is the thematic approach,” Levêque told me in a phone interview last week. The selection of sub-themes is diverse and nuanced as possible "to be as relevant as possible for users," elaborated Schaettel in a subsequent conversation.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-09 12:05

Hatched in the same laboratory as Siri, the voice-based assistant acquired by Apple, Trapit is a personalized search and discovery engine that runs on the premise that your love for your friends may not always extend to their taste in reading material.

“Personalization has become nothing more than a buzzword,” said Hank Nothhaft Jr, Chief Product Officer and Co-Founder of Trapit, which has been on the web since November, and unveiled its free iPad app today. “Personalization should be about you, the individual, and your unique tastes and interests, not about what your friends are buzzing about on Facebook and Twitter.”

Compared with other “personalized” news aggregators such as Flipboard, Trapit takes a distinctly antisocial approach to content discovery. Its goal is to capture the rich, long-tail content that is burrowing in hidden niches of the “deep web,” and serve it to you exactly as you like it, based on a thorough, algorithmic understanding your appetite (that we will get to in a moment).

Anti-social media

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-19 16:33

One news app, three editions. This is the concept behind ABC’s News’ new app, which comes in three versions: morning, midday and evening.

Why the change? “We realized that people are using the app in different ways at different points of the day,” said ABC’s senior vice president of digital, Joe Ruffolo to Jeff Sonderman at Poynter

ABC News has had almost two years to observe how its audience is engaging with its content on the iPad, after launching its first iPad app in July 2010, as paidContent points out. The article says ABC News’ digital team found that iPad use peaks in the evening, between 7pm and 10pm, when users watched one and a half times more video, and read 20% more stories than at any other time of day. The team also found that half of all news stories consumed on the iPad were read in the morning and evening.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-15 17:00

NPR announced yesterday that has it hired the Chicago Tribune’s Brian Boyer to direct a new team, dedicated to building news applications. NPR has produced news apps previously, such as this interactive look at the science of “Fracking” to extract gas, and this map of air-polluting facilities in the US. However, the staff who have worked on these types of projects haven’t been coordinated in a single department, and Boyer’s appointment will bring them together.

Mark Stencel, NPR’s Managing Editor for digital news, who will be in charge of Boyer and his team, tells Poynter; “what I’m hoping is that, by taking these positions and putting them together as a team, we’ll be able to do a higher level of [work] than we’ve been able to do with scattered design, database and development resources.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-23 10:37

The story breaks – a fire, earthquake, shooting or protest – and the race begins. You need to speak with someone who is at the scene, right now. Sifting through social media content can be a slow and painstaking process, with no guarantee that you will find an eyewitness source. Enter Geofeedia; a tool that allows journalists to zoom in on social media users posting geographically tagged tweets, photos and videos in a specified area.

Formally launched last week after months of testing, Geofeedia aggregates location-linked posts from Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Flickr and Picasa. By entering an address or drawing a circle on a map, you can call up the content being generated in your target region in real time. The creators vaunt it as a valuable tool for tracking down sources and images when text searches such as keywords and hashtags do not suffice.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-21 16:16

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Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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