WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Tue - 02.09.2014


Web 2.0

What if you could cross out tweets, asks Oliver Reichenstein, designer at the digital product company iA. He argues in a blog post that the new system could help users acknowledge their errors without looking as if they are trying to cover them up.

Reichenstein explains why he thinks a crossed-out tweet would be better than a deleted one: “A missing tweet also doesn’t explain why it’s missing. Excuses might be posted after the mistake happened — but they might also never be seen,” he writes.

“The only format that clearly states a mistake is a fat strike through. It is a strong answer to any interpretations and accusations that follow. It clearly says: “Don’t read this. This is all wrong. I take it back. I’m sorry.” Deleted tweets don’t say that — they smell like a cover-up and often make you look suspicious. And apologetic follow-up tweets don’t have the power to neutralize that screenshot of you screwing up,” he argues.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-19 10:49

“Twitter is not a media company,” said CEO Dick Costolo at the beginning of this year. Yet a number of recent developments have been threatening to prove him wrong.

Last week Twitter announced the launch of a #NASCAR hashtag page, where users can “discover the best Tweets, photos and perspectives from NASCAR drivers and their families, crews, commentators, celebrities and fans – all in a single timeline.”

In some ways, the page acts like a normal #search, with Tweets featuring the same hashtag collected together. However, Twitter’s #NASCAR page is presented with more visual content and a branded top banner, which makes it look more like a web page in its own right than a search function.

What really sets this page apart, however, is the fact that the Tweets are gathered through “a combination of algorithms and curation”. In other words, although the page uses Twitter’s automated search function, there is an editorial hand at work which chooses which posts to highlight.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-14 16:01

The transition from print to digital in the face of falling ad revenues and declining print circulation is causing a great deal of pain at established, professional news organisations. Think of the 600 cuts announced yesterday at Advance Publications in New Orleans and Alabama, or the recent cuts made at Johnston Press.

Yet this same switch to digital is being mirrored by some student publications - which are not bemoaning the end of print, but positively embracing it.

Nieman Lab reported last week that the University of Oregon’s student newspaper The Daily Emerald is cutting down print production and moving to digital despite not being in debt, having a “solid reserve fund” in the bank and just having experienced its best financial year in over a decade.

Rather than responding to immediate financial pressure, the Emerald says that it is making the switch “to deliver on our mission to serve our community and prepare our student staff for the professional world.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-13 18:14

On Tuesday night Anthony De Rosa (@AntDeRosa), a social media editor and columnist for Reuters - once crowned "the undisputed King of Tumblr" by The New York Times - shared a Google Doc entitled Public Cheat Sheet: Social Media for News on Facebook. The post quickly garnered 51 likes, 12 shares and 6 comments.

The doc, which is broken down under the headers Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest and Quora, is open to revision by users, and De Rosa's Twitter feed shows that he is taking his own advice by answering questions and thanking people who have contributed suggestions.

Here is an assortment of key suggestions, pirated in good faith from De Rosa's generously offered cheat sheet.

Three Tumblr tips:

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-13 13:20

Little Girl Slaps Mom with Piece of Pizza, Saves Life

I Can’t Stop Looking at This Weird Chinese Goat

Penguin Shits on Senate Floor

These are just a few of the SEO-rich headlines that Nieman Lab mentioned a few months ago in an article about Gawker’s strategy to drive more traffic to its site. The ploy isn’t bad; Nieman’s data suggests that these three posts alone generated more than 100,000 page views.

But while penguins and pizza violence might drive a lot of traffic across the web to Gawker, two recent studies suggest that, when it just comes down to Twitter, users prefer plain news from trusted sources.

An article by Megan Garber for The Atlantic reports on a study produced by UCLA and Hewlett-Packard's HP Labs, which suggests that “steadiness -- compelling news expressed in straightforward, not hyperbolic, language -- is actually a component of maximally shareable content.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-13 09:16

[View the story "Watergate at 40: the digital footprint of a scandal" on Storify]

To explore the digital storytelling that surrounds Watergate forty years after the scandal broke, we used Storify, an online curation tool that lets users pull together articles, videos, images and social media posts from across the web, link them with snippets of text, and format them into a embeddable, graphic narrative.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-12 15:37

Twenty-three years after tanks surged into Beijing and the military opened fire on pro-democracy protestors in Tiananmen Square, Twitter’s primary Chinese counterpart Sina Weibo has snuffed out the virtual flames of remembrance. Talk of the tragedy of June 4, 1989, which has never been publically commemorated in mainland China, is now being censored in both state-controlled and social media.

Yesterday Sina Weibo, the largest and most popular microblogging site in China, deactivated a candle emoticon – formerly used to commemorate deaths reported in the news – when its "rumour control" squad noticed that netizens had begun to adopt it as a symbol of the Tiananmen anniversary, according to the Shanghaiist.

Soon afterward, the Olympic flame emoticon, designed to promote this summer’s games, was deployed as a replacement, and extinguished in turn.

Sina Weibo also blocked access to the search terms “candle” and “never forget,” and to references to the date of the crackdown that took place 23 years ago today such as “six four” (June 4) and “23,” reported The Next Web.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-04 16:13

Any digital journalist knows that an infographic can tell a thousand words. While stringing a coherent sentence together used to require a great deal of learning in the language of code, this is no longer the case.

Data journalists at publications like the New York Times and the Guardian have, in recent years, elevated interactive graphics and data visualization to an art form. Meanwhile, the proliferation of build-your-own-infographic sites has empowered the rest of us to produce rougher, humbler versions, free of charge.

Tech entrepreneurs HackFwd launched one such site, Infogr.am, in public beta yesterday. The site invites you to log on using Facebook or Twitter, select a template, enter data in an Excel-style worksheet, embellish the automatically-conjured graphic with text, images and quotes, and share your masterpiece through the online channel of your choice.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-25 19:20

Remember the days before Craigslist, when newspapers made money from classified advertising?

In the year 2000, the U.S. newspaper industry brought in a high of nearly $20 billion dollars in classified revenue; by 2009, this figure had plummeted to under $10 billion. Meanwhile, the number of adult Internet users who visited online classified sites jumped from 22% in 2005 to 49% in 2009, according to findings from the Pew Research Centre’s Internet & American Life Project.

Since last fall, the Guardian Media Group has worked to recapture some of that lost revenue with n0tice.com, the digital answer to a community centre corkboard, which asks users, “what’s happening near you?” To post is free, but as with promoted Tweets, n0tice-ers can bump their bulletins to a privileged spot on the board for a fee.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-23 13:24

The story breaks – a fire, earthquake, shooting or protest – and the race begins. You need to speak with someone who is at the scene, right now. Sifting through social media content can be a slow and painstaking process, with no guarantee that you will find an eyewitness source. Enter Geofeedia; a tool that allows journalists to zoom in on social media users posting geographically tagged tweets, photos and videos in a specified area.

Formally launched last week after months of testing, Geofeedia aggregates location-linked posts from Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Flickr and Picasa. By entering an address or drawing a circle on a map, you can call up the content being generated in your target region in real time. The creators vaunt it as a valuable tool for tracking down sources and images when text searches such as keywords and hashtags do not suffice.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-21 16:16

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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