WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Mon - 23.10.2017


paid online content

Donata Hopfen, Bild Digital @ DME13
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“The challenge is to find out what the user really values your product for,” said Donata Hopfen, managing director of Bild Digital. Bild is planning to launch a premium online content offering this year, said Hopfen. It will be a ‘freemium’ offer, and Bild’s unique offering, the sort of news that only Bild can do, will be now be charged for, she specified.

“We were thinking very digital-first before, now we are thinking consumer-first,” said Frédérique Lancien, Digital and New Business Director at Groupe L'Equipe . “You need to think what consumers want before you build your offer,” she recommended.

At L’Équipe, the team looked at what sort of thing its customers already paid for, and tried to work out how to match these with what the paper could offer, combining its strong journalism with its massive archives. One product it came up with was e-books that offered a mass of content on an individual sportsperson, betting on the fact that sports fans want to know everything related to the sports that they love.

Paul Smurl, vice president of NYTimes.com paid products, also stressed the importance of finding out what your readers want. The paper conducted dozens of focus groups, he said, before launching metered paid online content, on topics such as what the pop-up pay prompt should look like.

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-04-17 10:18

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The report, released today, revealed that as in previous years, online news consumption was the only category of news to show growth in 2012. It rose sharply the last two years, following the rapid spread of digital platforms.

While digital media continues to threaten the newspaper industry, it also has the potential to force newspapers to experiment with new media.“For the first time since the deep recession that began in 2007, newspaper organizations have grounds for a modicum of optimism,” said the report.

“Companies have started to experiment in a big way with a variety of new revenue streams and major organizational changes,” the report continued.

One of these new revenue streams is, of course, digital subscription plans. So far, 450 of 1,380 U.S. dailies have started or announced plans for some kind of paid online content or paywall plan.

The New York Times, which has offered paid digital subscriptions since 2011, earned more money with paid subscriptions and purchases than with advertising revenues, a first for the paper. Across the country, digital pay plans are helping add new revenues and reduce dependence on advertising.

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Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-03-18 13:39

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The most obvious is advertising, of course: “you rent an audience, you gain an adjacency,” but other forms of subsidy as political parties and “rich guys” for whom news organisations are “intellectual jewelry." Government subsidies are even more significant.

The Internet is, in a way, the largest subsidy, Carr said: it has created “the biggest distribution network you have ever seen.” He contrasted the first article he published in a newspaper as a young journalist with one of his daughter’s first articles online – he had about 30,000 readers, she had 10.5m.

The problem is that content, and advertising, are almost infinite and when anything is infinite, the value gradually tends towards zero. What’s still expensive, is attention, Carr continued.

Some kind of paid model is the way forward, Carr believes. “People have a spiritual belief in the power of free. But it hasn’t worked,” he said. He pointed out that there are organisations such as BuzzFeed that are making money, but they have to rack up a vast number of page views to succeed.

At The New York Times “we haven’t lost uniques” since the introduction of the paywall, he said. “And there are 640,000 people who were giving us nothing; now they are giving us around $200 a year,” he remarked.

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-03-11 21:39

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As Director of Video Transformation at the Associated Press, Sue Brooks has done in depth research into the importance of video to the content offering of news sites. Below she explains how 'stickiness' of video supports paid content strategies, and encourages news publishers to "use video creatively, reinvent the genre," rather than copy broadcasters. The AP Video Hub makes it easy for publishers to download and edit raw footage.

 

Anthony Rose is the co-founder and CTO of Zeebox, a new platform for second-screen social engagement. He explains the concept and discusses how an "explosion of content" will get whittled down to the recommendations of friends.

Hear more from Sue and Anthony at DME13 in April. With thanks to ICM Business Video - our video partners at DME.

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Author

Nick Tjaardstra

Date

2013-03-02 14:11

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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