WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sat - 19.04.2014


Newsrooms and Journalism

This week as the Leveson Inquiry enters its final stage, Lord Black, chairman of the Press Standards Board of Finance, rejects statutory involvement in the press in favour of an “independently-led self-regulation.” (The Guardian)

The Italian watchdog Ossigeno per l’Informazione announced that starting this week it will publish a review in English on threats to journalists in Italy. Ossigeno Bad News, as the newsletter will be called, wants to compare Italian problems with similar problems in similar countries that have different press liberties. "The review will try to shed light on the dark forces which lurk behind the scenes of journalism and information: forces which are strongest in advanced countries, where all problems seem solved."

Mediaweek reports that The Sun is not only Britain's most-read paper but also its most 'liked' one. This week it became the country's first newspaper to achieve 1 million Facebook likes.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-09 17:57

Weekend video long(ish)-form: 5 essential TED Talks, as selected by the New Yorker.

Worried you might be tweeting into a vacuum? Try tweeting on weekends. But don’t let everybody start doing that, or else it will stop working. The BBC College of Journalism Blog offers pointers for making sure people pay attention to your 140 characters.

Al Jazeera's "The Stream" had its Twitter account hacked by supporters of Bashar al-Assad, according to the Huffington Post.

The Israeli journalist who drew on leaked army documents to report the alleged assassination of Palestinian militants was spared jail time in a plea bargain, reports Reuters via the Huffington Post

For more industry news, please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-06 17:55

As you are very nearly certain to have read, physicists at CERN, the European Center for Nuclear Research in Geneva, made a brain-bending announcement yesterday: the Higgs boson, or at least a “Higgslike” subatomic particle, is very nearly certain to exist.

What on (or beyond) Earth does that mean?

The Internet is awash with explanations, so many of us are probably nearly certain to have a pretty good idea. But in the grand tradition of high school science class, let's double-check with a pop quiz:

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-05 17:50

George Entwistle, currently Director of BBC Vision, was appointed today as the new Director-General of the BBC, reports the BBC. Read Entwistle’s memo to staff.

British Community Secretary Eric Pickles has threatened to outlaw local newspapers operated by local authorities, reports Press Gazette.

Twitter, which released its first transparency report on Monday (accessible via Mashable) faces the same dilemma as The New York Times, argues Mathew Ingram for Gigaom: to what extent should it be a platform, and to what extent a destination?

Ken Doctor writes for Nieman Lab on the “tablet aggregator wars” between Pulse and Flipboard, and "moving beyond Paywalls 1.0 to a more nuanced world of digital circulation.”

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-04 19:07

Glenn Mulcaire, the private investigator at the centre of the phone-hacking scandal that engulfed the News of the World last year, will be forced to reveal the name of the journalist who directed him to intercept phone messages. In a unanimous decision, five supreme court judges today ruled that Mulcaire must pass on information about how hacking targets were chosen and who his contacts at the paper were to the legal team representing Nicola Philips. Philips, a victim of phone-hacking was an assistant to publicist Max Clifford and is currently pursuing a claim for damages.

The decision puts an end to Mulcaire’s 20 month fight to avoid disclosing the potentially discriminating information. Mulcaire’s previous attempts to protect himself from requests to reveal details of his links with News of the World reporters had been ruled against by both the high court and the court of appeal. Mulcaire had attempted to invoke privilege against self-incrimination to avoid disclosing any details that "expose him to prosecution." When delivering today’s ruling Judge Lord Walker said: "The supreme court unanimously dismisses Mr Mulcaire's appeal. Section 72 of the [Senior Courts Act] excludes his privilege against self-incrimination: the proceedings brought by Ms Phillips are 'proceedings for … rights pertaining to …intellectual property' and the conspiracy proceedings to which Mr Mulcaire would expose himself on disclosure of the information amount to a 'related offence'."

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-04 18:43

They’re being touted as “the first social media Olympics” and London 2012’s organisers are embracing the opportunities social networks provide for sharing the event with fans around the globe.

The London games committee has launched a website, London2012.com, which will host events schedules, athlete biographies and invites users to register for activity updates. Speaking at a conference in April Alex Balfour, Head of New Media for the London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games, revealed that two apps would also be launched: Join In tracking the course of the Olympic torch, and a Results app that will report on results as they happen.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-04 16:31

For the second time in less than a week The New York Times’ account on the Chinese social-networking site Sina Weibo has been deactivated. Users wanting to interact with the NYT via the site are greeted with a “user does not exist” message. Techcrunch also reports that other Chinese social networking accounts bearing the NYTimes’ name have also been blocked, though the paper has yet to confirm that these are authentic.

As previously reported by the Editors Weblog last Thursday, The New York Times’ Sina Weibo account was suspended within hours of its launch, only to be reactivated the very same day. In the time before the account was reinstated, speculation was rife that the Times's efforts to expand into the Chinese market would be fraught with difficulty. This time the gravity of the matter appears to have escalated, as the Sina Weibo account has seemingly been deleted, not suspended as it was before.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-03 18:27

Digital First recognizes the importance of mobile in today’s news landscape.

Not the type of mobile that we wrote about last week, mind you; this kind is designed to pull into a high school parking lot equipped with lawn chairs and laptops just in time for the big game, sharing its WiFi and donuts with local bloggers.

Beginning this summer, residents of towns, suburbs and sprawling counties across the US are liable to stumble upon something resembling the above-described new media tailgate party – also known as a pop-up newsroom – at a local sporting event or community get-together.

The fully loaded newsmobile is just one of several crowdsourced ideas intended to place reporters face-to-face with the people for and about whom they write.

At the turn of 2012, Steve Buttry, the Director of Community Engagement and Social Media at Digital First, challenged all of the newsrooms under the company's umbrella to come up with fresh ideas for engaging with and serving their local communities, according to a post by Randy Parker, Managing Editor of the York Daily Record, on the YDR Insider blog.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-02 12:53

Yesterday, on CNN:

Kate Boulduan: “...I want to bring you the breaking news that, according to producer Bill Mears, the individual mandate is not a valid exercise of the commerce clause so it appears as if the Supreme Court justices have struck down the individual mandate— the centrepiece of the healthcare legislation. I’m going to hop back on this phone and try to get more information and bring it right to you, Wolf.”

Wolf Blitzer: “Wow, that's a dramatic moment. If in fact the Supreme Court has ruled that the individual mandate is in fact unconstitutional, that would be history unfolding.”

Banner: SUPREME CT. KILLS INDIVIDUAL MANDATE

…oops.

CNN, whose ratings have been slipping due to a paucity of hard-hitting news, according to The Associated Press, and which had been running a “countdown clock” to 10 am on its screen for hours leading up to the announcement, is reported to have also tweeted and emailed the faulty news to its followers.

Meanwhile, on Fox News:

Bill Hemmer made a similar gaffe, declaring it “breaking news” that the individual mandate had been declared unconstitutional, and a Twitter account run by Fox anchor Bret Baier allegedly posted the same news.

Meanwhile, at the White House:

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-29 16:29

A long-form piece for the weekend: Tim de Lisle of Intelligent Life follows the "triumphs and tribulations" of the Guardian, and talks to its piano-playing Editor-in-Chief, Alan Rusbridger, in an attempt to answer its provocative headline: Can the Guardian Survive?

“Yesterday’s News Corp split announcement could spell big changes at The Times as Rupert Murdoch vowed losses would not be tolerated at any of the company’s print titles,” begins an article by Andrew Pugh on PressGazette. Murdoch reportedly said yesterday that he plans to be more "bullish" in the US than in the UK, and that “each newspaper will be expected to pay its way.”

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-29 16:13

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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