WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Mon - 21.04.2014


Newsrooms and Journalism

Pubblico, the independent Italian newspaper that launched on Tuesday, is off to a flying start. According to news website Lettera 43, the paper sold 50,000 copies of its first issue. Pubblico’s founder, journalist Luca Telese, has hailed this initial success as a victory over sceptics who thought a print-based venture was destined for failure.

On Poynter, journalism educator Kelly Fincham offers advice on "What every young journalist should know about using Twitter."

"We access news on multiple devices. Shouldn’t those devices be smart enough to connect our actions to their presentation?" Analyst Ken Doctor discusses "all-access delight" in his latest newsonomics post on Nieman Lab.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-21 18:54

In the UK, the Daily Mail's website, MailOnline, has passed the 100 million unique browser mark for the first time, according to new figures released by ABC and reported by Press Gazette. The site recorded a record 105,720,020 in August 2012, which represents a 41.1 percent increase over August 2011.

Journal Register Company, which recently filed for bankruptcy, is likely to reduce print frequency at some of its 20 US daily newspapers, writes Rick Edmonds on Poynter's website.

The Guardian's Roy Greenslade reports that the number of signers to a petition "urging Sun editor Dominic Mohan to stop publishing page 3 girl pictures," has now nearly doubled in just the past couple of days to more than 23,000.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-20 18:20

The Guardian has announced that Tanya Cordrey has been named to the new role of Chief Digital Officer. She is currently GNM's Director of Digital Development. In the same announcement, the company said David Pemsel, GNM's interim Chief Marketing Officer, has been promoted to the new position of Chief Commercial Officer.

The Huffington Post reports that Se & Hoer, a Danish celebrity weekly magazine, will publish the topless photos of the Duchess of Cambridge in a 16-page supplement that is sold with its Thursday edition.

Speaking of Huffington Post, an article on Mashable describes what a smash hit HuffPost Live has been in its first month on the air. To date, "HuffPost Live has aired 12 hours of original video per day, five days a week, with more than 2,000 guests appearing on air," according to the Mashable report.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-19 17:57

Today, September 19, is Italy's “Day of Transparency:" which activists hope to use to put pressure on the government for the adoption of a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) in the country.

A group of associations and prominent individuals started a campaign last spring to demand the introduction of a law that allows citizens to have access to  documentation from the public administration. The initiative was presented at the Italian Parliament on May 29 this year. Amongst the organizers are the Italian Association of Newspaper Publishers (FIEG) and the National Federation of the Italian Press (FNSI) and personalities like Valerio Onida, President emeritus of the Constitutional Court.
Gathered today in Rome at the headquarters of the FNSI, the promoters are holding a conference with speeches from professors, politicians and journalists.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-09-19 12:40

BBC's new director general vows to re-invent content, not just re-purpose it, says paidContent, while the Guardian reports on George Entwistle's plans for a "radical" shape-up at the BBC.

The editor of the Irish Daily Star has been suspended following the paper's publication of the topless duchess photos, according to Press Gazette.

While back in France where the pictures were originally published, Closer is now being sued by Dominique Strauss Kahn, says LePoint.fr.

Roy Greenslade describes the acceleration of the Change.org 'drop page 3' campaign, which is calling upon Sun Editor Dominic Mahon to stop printing or posting pictures of topless women.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-18 18:50

Journalists and news organisations love Twitter. The micro-blogging social network allows publishers and reporters to interact with readers and audiences, encouraging debate and discussion about articles and increase awareness of news brands. 

But every now and then Twitter reminds us that tweets and hashtags can take on a life of their own. When Newsweek attempted to use the handle #MuslimRage to generate public conversation around its coverage of the violence sparked in the Middle East by anti-Islam film The Innocence of Muslims, the embattled title soon found itself at the centre of a social media backlash.

Printed in conjunction with an equally controversial article by Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Newsweek’s current front cover shows two (assumedly) Muslim men apparently incandescent with anger, accompanied by a headline declaring ‘MUSLIM RAGE: How I survived it. How we can end it.” Within a matter of hours #MuslimRage was trending on Twitter and had become the subject of widespread mirth.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-18 18:18

2013 will see publishing giant Condé Nast launch a French version of Vanity Fair.  The US magazine already publishes international editions in Britain, Spain and Italy and latest member of the Vanity Fair family is set to hit French newsstands before next summer.

Executives will be hoping that further expansion in the European market will compensate for disappointing ad revenue and circulation figures in the US. At the beginning of this year Vanity Fair USA saw circulation decline by almost 5 per cent to 1.22 million. The New York Times reports that Q2 figures for 2012 show that total advertising revenue for the US magazine rose 5.9 per cent, but ‘the number of advertising pages declined by 1 per cent.’

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-18 15:45

The beat generation is behind us, according to Gideon Lichfield, Global News Editor at Atlantic Media’s soon-to-launch digital business brand Quartz.

Writing on his blog, News Thing, Lichfield deconstructs the notion of “beat” journalism, along with its assumption that news falls naturally into tidy thematic pigeonholes such as “education” or “real estate.” It doesn’t, he argues; newspapers carved it up that way to lend structure to their product, to efficiently divide the labour of their reporters and editors, and to ensure that they appealed to a comprehensive swath of readers and advertisers, as per the old business model.

Online, he asserts, such an approach does not make sense. In a realm where “readers can browse hundreds of news sites at no extra cost,” for each publication to attempt to cover a “comprehensive” range of interest areas, and stuff them into thematic boxes would be inefficient and illogical. Free of the constraints of pages and sections, why not frame the world in a more organic way?

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-17 18:20

In a post titled "A quick note on innovation in media" on his blog, Adam Westbrook offers this advice: "The first thing to realise is that the secret is not to come up with a new idea. There is rarely such a thing. Instead, the secret is to look at a space with people, or businesses already established, and see what they’re doing wrong. Then invent something that improves on what they do."

Mario García takes a look at USA Today's new website, which he notes "combines clever design with new ideas for advertising and marketing."

In India, "HT Media's business daily, Mint has completely revamped its website (www.livemint.com) and launched an integrated newsroom that caters to print and digital platforms," reports Biprorshee Das on the afaqs! website.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-17 18:11

Another week, another royal photo scandal. The Duchess of Cambridge is the latest member of the British royal family to be captured in a compromising position. Topless photos of the duchess on holiday in the south of France with her husband Prince William were splashed across the cover of the French edition of Closer.

The couple are said to be both saddened and angered by the gossip magazine’s decision to publish the photos (seemingly taken with a long-lens camera) and the palace has issues a strongly worded statement comparing the intrusion to the press’s harassment of the late Princess of Wales.

Responding to what she called a “disproportionate reaction” to the images, French Closer’s editor in chief Laurence Pieau insisted that there was “nothing shocking” about the photos, which she describes as a “joyous” celebration of an attractive young couple in love. Pieau then dismisses the complaints of the British press as hypocritical, as certain sections of it published naked photos of the third in line to the throne barely two weeks ago.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-14 18:44

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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