WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sat - 20.12.2014


Newspaper

"One year ago today we put our beliefs before our lives, released Cablegate and changed the world." WikiLeaks tweeted today.

The organisation has just won a major Australian prize for journalistic excellence, the Walkley Award for 'Most Outstanding Contribution to Journalism'. The Walkley Foundation stated that Wikileaks has earned this recognition of its "courageous and controversial commitment to the finest traditions of journalism: justice through transparency".

The release of US diplomatic cables by WikiLeaks is often viewed as one of the most radical events in journalism, with many supporters claiming that the information revealed by the cables contributed to the end of the war in Iraq and helped spark the Tunisian uprisings which then spread to become the phenomenon widely referred to as the 'Arab Spring'.

The success of Wikileaks has led to many people seeing this kind of online-based leaking system as a new model for journalism; but one that is not without its flaws.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-29 14:33

Advertising in the news industry: Has social media changed the opposition between advertising and journalism? Where do you draw the line on "advertorials"?

Twitter v Liveblog: is the liveblog as good as Twitter, possibly better? Poynter dicusses.

Storify helps combat 'media blackouts': how the media aggregator site helped collect information about the Occupy Wallstreet movement.

Google+: still a valuable tool to connect with readers? The New York Times thinks so.


For more industry news please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service



Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-28 20:10

Today the Leveson Inquiry has heard more revelations regarding the behaviour of the British tabloid press.

To summarise, witnesses today included Christopher Jefferies, who was falsely accused and vilified by the media as the killer of Joanna Yates; Ian Hurst, a former British army intelligence officer whose computers was allegedly hacked by the News of the World in order to obtain details of an IRA informer; Jane Winter, a peace and human rights campaigner in Ireland; Anne Diamond, a former television presenter; and Charlotte Church, a singer who was thrust into the limelight at a very young age. You can read coverage of the whole thing here.

Jeffries related that he felt as if he were under "house arrest" after his arrest by police and that he had to stay with numerous friends to avoid media scrutiny, feeling "rather as if I was a recusant priest at the time of the Reformation, going from safe house to safe house".

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-28 19:21

News today is all about being first; 'real time' is king; users want the latest information in the quickest possible time delivered straight to their mobile device so they are constantly kept abreast of unfolding world events. Right?

Well, yes... and no.

It seems that Facebook is producing something of a Lazarus effect for old news content. Stories that were written more than a decade ago are increasingly becoming viral phenomena thanks to the new 'frictionless sharing' system introduced by the social network in September.

Frictionless sharing means that articles read by Facebook users are automatically shared with friends. This means that if you happen to glance at a story with a sensationalist headline that was published by a site that uses a Facebook app to integrate their content into the network via "open graph", then that sensational headline will appear on all your friends' newsfeeds - many of whom are just as likely to be lured to click on said headline as you were. This process is repeated several times over; and then again; and again. Thus, the article goes viral.

The Guardian and The Independent have both integrated their content into Facebook and this has lead to wide and rapid distribution of their content via the social network.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-28 16:45

Foursquare has created an infographic showing travel patterns across the USA from Halloween to just after Christmas 2010.

Learn "Google-Fu": improve your research skills and learn how to Google more effectively.

The Daily Mail set a new monthly traffic record for their site, achieving 79 million unique browsers during that month.

Facebook users in Thailand have been warned not to 'like' anti-monarchy pages, as such a statement could result in a prison sentence for insulting a monarchy.

BBC has been found guilty of biased coverage in the form of one TV item when covering the large-scale eviction of travelers from the Dale Farm site in the UK.

For more industry news please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.



Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-25 17:32

Today is the final day of hearings for this week. The line-up brought before the inquiry today continued to feature high profile celbrity figures and legal experts. The witnesses were: "HJK", an anonymous member of the public who had a relationship with an unnamed celebrity; Sienna Miller, a British actress; Mark Thomson, a solicitor who has represented Naomi Campbell, Sienna Miller and others in landmark privacy cases; Max Mosley, former head of the FIA, a role which included running Formula One motor racing; and JK Rowling, author of the Harry Potter series.

"HJK"

This witness gave evidence "in camera", away from the press, under an anonymity order.

Sienna Miller

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-24 18:27

In the MIT Media Lab, Dan Schultz, newly named Knight-Mozilla fellow, is working on something that could benefit journalists and readers alike, Nieman Lab reports. His invention could change the way you see the world - but he is not developing a pair of rose tinted spectacles - Schultz is creating "truth goggles".

These "truth goggles" are intended to take the form of open source software that journalists and readers alike can download for free and then, when they read articles, any claims that seem to be founded on dubious information would be highlighted and brought to the readers attention.

The software will rely on natural language processing, the same kind of technology that enables Siri to understand human speech, and analyse articles looking for statements that match subjects covered by research contained in the PoltiFact database. Subjects discussed in articles that match the database can then be given an equivalent rating, from 'true' all the way down to 'pants on fire'.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-24 13:28

Today is international day to end impunity. Every year journalists are murdered, but nine times out of ten their killers walk free. Find out more and watch the video here.

James Murdoch has resigned from the board of News Group Newspapers and Times Newspapers Ltd., meaning he is no longer on the boards of the Sun or the Times. But he still remains chairman of news international.

We're seeing the rise and rise of digital media: YouTube now has over 3.5 billion hits a day and over 800 million unique users a month.

Reporters Without Borders reports that journalists have been arrested and physically by security forces during the ongoing clampdown on protesters in Cairo and other Egyptian cities.

And finally, Google announces some concessions to its new initiative to charge some users for its Maps API

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-23 19:16

The Leveson Inquiry in phone-hacking has now heard evidence from core participants for the third consecutive day.

The witnesses who gave testimony today were: Mark Lewis, solicitor for the Dowler family, Sheryl Gascoine, the former wife of Paul Gascoine, a former Daily Telegraph journalist named Tom Rowland, whose phone was hacked to gain information about his wealthy and famous contacts, along with Gerry and Kate McCann, who have already won libel a case against Express Newspapers for the way in which the press falsely implied the family were involved in death of their daughter.

Mark Lewis

Lewis submitted an addition to his witness statement today, although it has been removed from the Inquiry website.

Lewis is the second core participant to criticize Daily Mail writer Amanda Platell, who accused him of being a "greedy lawyer" and seeking a larger settlement sum, which was not true. Lewis contacted the lawyers at The Daily Mail and the article was removed from the website.

He also spoke in support of the importance of no win, no fee arrangements in bringing libel actions.


Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-23 18:55

Does the US government have the right to read you Twitter messages? Of course not, would be most people's reaction. Unfortunately, thanks to a US district court ruling made on November 10, the US government can now compel Twitter to release information that most people would deem private, such as your IP address, the content of your direct messages and your session times and activities, according to OWNI.

Why is this acceptable? The reason, the judge explained, was because in agreeing with the terms of service, Twitter users "voluntarily relinquished any reasonable expectation of privacy".

Twitter attempted to fight the ruling over a protracted year-long appeal process. However, losing the case has created a potentially dangerous precedent: the ruling could mean that any website with servers in the US could be asked to hand the data held on those servers to the government, without the need to obtain a warrant.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-23 15:57

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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