WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 23.11.2014


Newspaper

'Hatchet Job': a term first used in 1944, denoting 'a forceful or malicious verbal attack'. So who would want to celebrate 'hatchet jobs' in literary criticism? The Omnivore would, that's who.

Too often, the Omnivore believes, the review sections of newspapers, especially the books section, go ignored by readers because the writing is "inward-looking and self-serving." The publication, which aggregates and showcases criticism relating to literature, film and theatre to provide readers a "cross section of critical opinion", is running the 'Hatchet Job of the Year' award that aims to reward book reviews that are "not simply informative, but entertaining". Anna Baddeley from The Omnivore team explained to the Editors Weblog why celebrating the hatchet job is the ideal way to encourage great quality literary criticism.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-12-20 20:04

ProPublica has created an "explore sources" button that allows readers to check the sources behind an article without leaving the page. See how they did it here.

31 weekly newspapers have closed in the UK this year.

The Guardian downsizes: the separate film and music supplement will now be a feature in the daily G2 supplement and the main newspaper will lose at least 4 pages.

Designing or adjusting your social media policy? Here's some advice on what good social media policies should do.

Christopher Hitchens, journalist, secularist and conversationalist has died: the contributing editor for Vanity Fair passed away due to pneumonia as a complication of esophageal cancer.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-12-16 19:01

A new study from the USC Annenberg Center for the Digital Future states that the majority of newspapers in the USA will cease to exist in printed form within the next five years. The report asked whether America had arrived at a "digital turning point" and examined the role of new, often disruptive, digital technologies in American politics, media, communication and the American lifestyle in general.

The report concluded that, as print circulation continues to drop, most newspapers will suffer, causing them to terminate printing operations altogether. Whether publications stand a chance of maintaining printed editions seems to be a question of size; large organisations, such as The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal and USA Today, could potentially keep their printed editions, whilst local weeklies presumably thanks to their small numbers of staff and dedicated readerships, could also keep their printed editions.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-12-16 16:18

The New York Times reports that a senior editor and a top executive of the Russian news magazine Kommersant Vlast have been fired, apparently due to the publication's coverage of Russia's contentious parliamentary elections. The magazine reported accusations of wide-spread electoral fraud and published a photo of a spoiled ballot with profanity directed at Vladimir Putin.

James Murdoch did receive an email including information that phone hacking at the News of the World was not limited to a single reporter, writes The Guardian. However, Mr Murdoch wrote to MP's stating that he had not read the relevant email in full.

Digital publishing company SAY Media has bought up the popular technology blog ReadWriteWeb, reports Paid Content. The blog's founder and editor-in-chief Richard MacManus will continue in his managing role, while Dan Frommer, founder and editor-in-chief of another technology site, SplatF, has been hired as editor-at-large.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-12-14 19:30

Times are tough for the LA Times as Russ Stanton, who has been editor of the paper for the past four years, is standing down amidst the expectation of more job cuts.

Stanton leaves the news organisation on December 23rd and will be replaced by managing editor Davan Maharaj.

The LA Times published a positive review of Stanton's achievements with the paper, noting that under his leadership the paper extended its digital reach to over 17 million readers and won three Pulitzer Prizes.

Yet the LA Times acknowledges that the past four years have been a rocky period, citing problems caused by contracting newspaper circulation and shrinking advertising revenue. The New York Times provides some sobering statistics: the American newspaper industry saw a 26.2% drop in advertising revenue from 2008 to 2009 and an additional 4.6% decline last year.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-12-14 14:48

Want to learn how to program? An online book has just been released aimed at teaching absolute beginners how to use Ruby, a coding language used by many open source applications, such as Ruby on Rails.

The Guardian has put together an interactive map to show the amount and location of civilian deaths in Syria after the uprising earlier this year.

Detained Syrian blogger Razan Ghazzawi has been charged with "establishing an organization that aims to change the social and economical entity of the state" and "weakening the national sentiment, and trying to ignite sectarian strife", offenses that can lead to 15 years in prison.

Google+ has made it easier for bloggers to share their material on their site.

The Los Angeles Police Department is investigating the arrest of a journalist during an Occupy protest after a video published on YouTube shows footage that contradicts the police account of the arrest.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-12-13 19:46

The Guardian's new community platform, n0tice, has announced new revenue sharing model that will allow users who set up their own online notice boards to share the advertising revenue generated from their board.

The site allows people to create an online notice board that will link them to the rest of their local community. This board can then become a place to advertise upcoming events, buy or sell goods or just share what's going on in the neighbourhood. The service is free, but it costs approximately £1 per day for the ad to be placed in a featured spot on the site, where it will be displayed to users within a one-mile radius of the advertiser's location. The price increases depending on the advertisement's geographical distribution, the size and how long it is displayed for.

Users who host ads on their notice boards will now be able to claim 85% of the revenue generated by these advertisements, the other 15% going to The Guardian. The revenue can be viewed on the 'admin' tab of a user's notice board and there is an option to send all revenue directly to charity.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-12-13 19:10

Britain is producing an impressive amount of female journalism graduates. But once they leave school, are they becoming journalists? Yes, suggests a new piece of research from City University, London, but not necessarily with national dailies.

Just over a week ago, Kira Cochrane published an article in The Guardian, noting a lack of women in British media. Cochrane ran an initiative to count all the bylines in Monday to Friday editions of seven national newspapers over a four week period. The results were combined with an analysis on the number of women who appeared on Radio 4's the Today programme to produce a final figure: 77.4% of the journalists surveyed were male.

The results were of a peace with a survey conducted by the advocacy group Women in Journalism this March. The study pointed to the low proportion of women working in UK national dailies, as well as to the fact that female journalists held fewer senior positions.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-12-13 18:33

The relationship between print and digital is a complex one. 'Digital first' has become a creed for many publications, hoping to ride the wave of technological disruption that has been rippling through the industry for years. Newspapers are obviously proud of their print heritage, but the tendency to put print under the category 'legacy media' doesn't show much faith in it remaining an important medium in years to come.

Yet, despite the often dismissive attitude displayed towards print, many newspapers continue to see the value in their printed product, so much so that they are in fact expanding print operations. Last week The Columbus Dispatch announced it would expand printing operations after Gannett announced it would stop printing in Cincinnati and hand over it's printing obligations to The Dispatch; evidence that while some newspapers are clearly looking to rid themselves of their printing duties, others are growing to take up their roles.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-12-13 15:41

Ali Ferzat, a Syrian cartoonist, and the Weekly Eleven News have received the 2011 Press Freedom Award from Reporters Without Borders, for being "two symbols of courage".

Ben Smith of Politico has been hired by BuzzFeed to head a new initiative to introduce original reporting to the site.

Here's a great tutorial on how journalists can use GeoCommons to create interactive maps to display data.

Two men held for five days in China for 'spreading rumours' on the Internet by posting a video supposedly showing a police convey guarding a wedding.

Is censorship easing in Burma? Journalists talk about their optimism and their uncertainty, living in a political climate where freedom of expression is becoming increasingly accepted.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-12-12 20:01

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Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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