WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sat - 20.12.2014


Journalism

Unlike QR codes, AR uses a phone’s camera to recognize specific images (in this case, newspaper pages) and superimposes information over the camera feed. AR technology opens related links and content within its app, whereas QR codes externally connect to links on mobile web browsers. Industry analysts agree that AR has more potential for newspapers than QR codes, which have been deemed “dead” by most.

Independent+ uses iPhone, iPad and Android app Blippar to update select print stories with new information and additional multimedia features. The newspaper is also using the app to increase audience engagement by allowing readers to vote in polls related to opinion articles. The Independent said AR supplements will be available in all sections of the newspaper, according to Press Gazette.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-26 15:36

“If you can’t stomach the gore, don’t run the photo. Period,” wrote Orange County Register Editor Charles Apple, who first brought attention to The Daily News’ photoshopping.

The Daily News declined to comment on its editorial decision, but the question of whether to publish graphic images is one many other editors confront.

FOR GORE

Some advocate for the publication of graphic photos, arguing that text can never show the true magnitude of a horror as visuals do.

“I think TV news distances and ‘shrink-wraps’ human suffering,” writes Zeynep Tufekci, a fellow at Princeton University’s Center for Information Technology Policy. “[A]nd I believe such mode of reporting is against the public interest.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-18 12:30

Reporters Lisa Song, Elizabeth McGowan and David Hasemyer’s seven-month investigation into the 2010 Kalamazoo oil spill revealed details that preceded national reports by weeks, despite InsideClimate News’ limited funding. Founder and Publisher David Sassoon estimated, salaries included, InsideClimate News spent only 10 percent of what a major newsroom would have budgeted for a similar investigation, according to Forbes.

With reporters and contributors now scattered across the globe, in Istanbul, New Delhi, Boston and San Diego, the startup has come a long way from its original two-person staff. But this recognition could thrust it even further forward: Sassoon told Forbes he envisions a staff of around 25 and a newsroom in New York.

“I think it’s a game changer,” Sassoon said of the award. “I think the Pulitzer Committee probably knew that. We earned the award. ... But I think they would understand how validation from them, the top honor in journalism, would make a big difference to us as a tiny startup.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-17 13:42

“This is not about getting the right women on air,” said Tim Davie, acting BBC Director General. “This is about getting the right people on air.”

Studies have shown that male experts are four times more likely to appear on radio and TV than females, but the BBC has been known for male-dominated programs including Radio 4’s Today, on which men are featured at a six to one ratio to women, The Telegraph reported. Last year Culture Secretary Ed Vaizey likened the program a “terrible cliched locker room.”

In fact, on July 5, 2011, “you had to wait from 6.15 am until 8.20 am to hear the one female contributor who appeared alongside the 27 male contributors on programme,” Kira Cochrane reported. She found that 83.5 percent of Today’s contributors were male at the time of her study in 2011.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-26 18:06

VIDA, founded in 2009 to encourage dialogue about gender issues as they relate to the literary arts, hoped that by seeing irrefutable, black-and-white numbers, editors wouldn’t be able to deny or rationalize gender gaps in their publications. But the third year of “The Count” shows little change for most included publications.

Many publishers have apparently ignored VIDA’s numbers, or worse, Amy King of VIDA writes: “I fear the attention we’ve already given them has either motivated their editors to disdain the mirrors we’ve held up to further neglect or encouraged them to actively turn those mirrors into funhouse parodies at costs to women writers as yet untallied.”

“Reason hasn’t worked,” she writes in response to the 2012 data, a reflection of “gross (& indecent) neglect of female writers’ work.”

VIDA’s 2012 graphs show the number of female book reviewers, women's bylines and reviews of books by female authors at 15 different journals, including The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Times Literary Supplement and The New York Times Book Review. Most remained relatively consistent in their year-to-year stats, though Harper’s notably decreased its percentage of female book reviewers from 30 percent last year to just under 10 percent this year.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-25 16:55

"The collective intelligence of the newsroom is something we rarely exploit efficiently," writes Gavin Sheridan, Innovation Director of Storyful in a blog post where he discusses the concept of newsrooms as intelligence agencies.

On the Ebyline Blog, Susan Johnston reports on the acceleration of paywalls at US newspapers based on the latest data from the Newspaper Association of America.

The Guardian reports that Twitter has suspended the account of Guy Adams, a journalist for the UK's Independent, who was critical of Olympics coverage by NBC.

"At the Financial Times, we recognized early on that the continued success of our business depended on our ability to adapt to changing reader habits," writes Rob Grimshaw of the FT in an article about "publishing in the age of social media" on The Economist Group's website.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-07-31 17:23

This summer’s London Olympics are set to be a time of intense competition – and not just for the athletes involved in the sporting events. Yesterday, Facebook unveiled “Explore London 2012:” its new portal for this summer’s Olympic Games, suggesting that traditional media outlets may be facing increasing competition from social media in their coverage of this year’s Olympics.

Explore London 2012, which Reuters reports took 18 months to develop, is a gateway to other Facebook pages, relating to individual athletes, country teams and sporting events. Users who like the main portal will also see updates from the Olympics in their newsfeeds, and those who like individual pages will also be able to see their posts and pictures from the Games. The whole process allows fans and athletes to communicate directly though posts and comments, rather that working through the medium of a news organisation.

Ingrid Lunden at TechCrunch writes that the link between the Games and Facebook is “not exclusive”. The Games will also have a branded Twitter page (something we have already seen for NASCAR) a portal on Google+ and partnerships with Foursquare, Tumblr and Instragram.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-19 15:30

Good news for royalists and for fans of free content. Press Gazette reports that The Times and Sunday Times of London will be dropping their paywalls this weekend in honour of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. The Sunday Times app will also be available for free trial period over the weekend, notes the article.

Will Bunch from Poynter weighs the arguments about the New Orleans Times-Picayune’s decision to cut print publication to just three days a week and go digital first. In this thoughtful article, Bunch suggests ways to move beyond the conflict between print-first and digital-first advocates, and create better and more inclusive news reporting in New Orleans.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-31 17:40

The UK Supreme Court is preparing to decide next Wednesday whether Julian Assange should be deported to Sweden, where he is wanted for questioning over allegations of sexual assault, reports the Guardian. The paper writes that the verdict is likely to hinge on the judges’ decision over whether the European Arrest Warrant issued for Assange is valid.

El Pais has posted a video interview with John Paton, CEO of Digital First Media, who explains the “digital first” philosophy that underpins his company. “Technology is 100% of the future,” he says.

Press Gazette reports that the Sun’s Fabulous magazine is re-launching its website in a new, blog-style format. The article notes that stories used to be posted on the website just once a week, but now, according to editor Rachel Richardson, it will be edited “literally minute by minute.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-23 17:07

Journalism.co.uk reports that News Corp has seen its net profit jump by 47% for the first three months of 2012, compared to the same period the previous year, in spite of having spent $167m on its legal response to the phone hacking scandal. Although the company saw its total operating profit grow by 23% year-on-year, operating profit at the company’s publishing division fell by 19%, says the article.

The publisher of Mail Online, Martin Clarke, has appeared before the Leveson inquiry and has warned that over-regulation would damage the UK newspaper business, writes Press Gazette. “If we don’t allow UK newspapers to compete effectively in this online world then we aren’t going to have much of an industry left to regulate,” said Clarke, according to the article.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-10 17:59

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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