WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Thu - 02.10.2014


Journalism and Newsrooms

A week from today, French radio station France Culture will launch a new web portal geared at luring the next generation of listeners to the airwaves via the Internet.

"France Culture Plus" as the new site is called, will mix content from campus radio stations with original work created by students specifically for the web platform, selects from the station’s own academically relevant programming, and audio and video recordings of university lectures and events.

The cultural radio station, which celebrates its 50th birthday next year, is not the only heritage media outlet in France to be reaching out to students this fall. Today, national television station France Télévisions announced “francetvéducation,” a free educational platform targeted at students, parents and teachers. At the end of October, daily newspaper Le Figaro also launched a website dedicated to students, www.lefigaroetudiant.fr.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-11-19 19:32

Election day has arrived, and even those of us without an iota of American heritage (let alone suffrage) are slightly a-twitch in our chairs as we play with interactive graphics and wait to see whether Twitter is really going to break. Today, undecided voters— those fickle objects of the mass media’s fascination, and Bill Maher’s derision— will have to slide to one side or the other, or perch on white picket forever. And by now, those newspapers that wish to have picked a side.

This year, Barack Obama is leading Mitt Romney 41 to 35 in endorsements from the nation’s 100 highest-circulation newspapers, according to the American Presidency Project. The newspapers that are backing Obama have a circulation of over 10 million between them, while those that support Romney have a combined circulation of around 6.5 million.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-11-06 18:50

Question of the day: What is the relationship between the so-called "Frankenstorm" and anthropogenic (human-driven) climate change? Hint: This is not a question that can be answered in 140 characters.

Attributing a single extreme weather event such as a sub-tropical cyclone called Sandy to the human-driven shift in global climate (or, what Andrew Revkin calls "the overall experiment we're conducting on the planet's atmosphere") is, for now, impossible.

But to report on this storm in isolation, without regard for the climatic context in which it is situated, would be to paint an incomplete picture of a reality that affects us all.

Here are six articles by journalists and scientists who have successfully risen to the significant challenge of situating Sandy in its Frankencontext.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-30 19:14

It has now been said repeatedly that India – together with Brazil – is a booming market for newspapers. Factors include economic growth, urbanization, an expanding middle class and rising literacy rates, as a recent report by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism has said. As much has been written recently on the Indian news media last month, Professor George Brock, Head of Journalism at City University, collected the links in one place.

During catastrophes, reliable data is an essential part of news coverage. The Guardian Datablog mapped every verified event when Hurricane Sandy hit the US East Coast.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-10-30 18:53

On Monday, the day incoming New York Times CEO Mark Thompson was supposed to be welcomed with an awkward class photo at the newspaper’s headquarters, memo leaker extraordinaire Jim Romenesko published an email from the Newspaper Guild of New York’s ‘Mobilization Committee’ affirming that hundreds of The Times’ staffers had quietly pledged to “withhold their bylines, photo credits, and producing credits” (aka to hold a 'byline strike') and to “work strictly to the terms of the contract” if necessary.

This email came well over a year into contract negotiations between the Guild and The Times' management. It argued that the newspaper’s negotiators are seeking to implement “what amount to the most radical pay cuts for the New York Times staff in modern history” and spread the word on ways in which irate staffers could get their voices heard, the byline strike and working to contract ideas being two such suggestions. Its sender was Grant Glickson, Chairperson of The Times unit of the Newspaper Guild of New York.

“We don’t know yet if we will have to go down this road, but it is vital that we be prepared,” wrote Glickson.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-24 18:28

UK Prime Minister David Cameron will sit down in the next month to consider his response to the Leveson Inquiry into media standards and must then decide whether to accept its recommendations on media regulation.

When he does so, I wonder if the changes to the South Africa system announced last week will be brought to his attention.

The press in both countries have until now been self-regulated. While the context and circumstances are vastly different, journalistic practices and ethics in both have been under scrutiny and politicians and disaffected publics have been threatening to rein in the media because of a perceived failure of self-regulation.

South Africa’s print media last week announced it would adopt a system of independent co-regulation between the media and the public. A retired judge would head a new press council, equally divided between media and members of the public, eliminating media bias.

In the UK this weekend there was much debate about which way the government would go. Cameron promised no state regulation of the press. However he said he would take heed of Leveson’s recommendations, unless they were bonkers or heavy-handed.

Author

Cherilyn Ireton's picture

Cherilyn Ireton

Date

2012-10-08 17:49

This editorial is a joint statement from the Vienna-based International Press Institute (IPI) and the Paris and Darmstadt-based World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA).

 

In the United States, a movie trailer of uncertain origin is posted on YouTube, purporting to promote “Innocence of Muslims”. Though the trailer is an unbearably stupid, incredibly offensive portrayal of the Prophet Muhammad, with production values of a high-school parody, the trailer sets off a wave of anti-American violence in the Middle East.

Let’s not let the harmful acts of a few overshadow the rest.

Though the average American would be offended by the portrayal, and would agree the film does not represent common perceptions about Islam, American embassies across the Middle East and North Africa have become the target of protests and attacks. The spread, scale and intensity of the protests are surprising when one considers how marginal and absurd the film is that purportedly sparked them.

Sustained demonstrations against U.S. embassies have been reported in some 20 countries around the world, and have resulted in several deaths. The most shocking attack occurred on a consulate in Libya, where four Americans, including the ambassador, Christopher Stevens, were killed. (Officials in Libya have since arrested a number of people in connection with what may have been a premeditated attack.)

Author

Guest

Date

2012-09-24 15:39

Tomorrow is the thirtieth birthday of USA Today. The country’s second most widely read newspaper is celebrating by presenting a bold new face to the world, in print and across all digital platforms. This is the first time the paper has been significantly redesigned in its three decades of existence, and commentators are divided. Some view it as a desperate move to escape an inevitable spiral toward a Kodak-like fate, while others welcome a new shake-up by the American newspaper industry’s original change artist.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-14 18:21

If you approached a newsstand a year ago today, no matter where on the planet you were, chances are good that you were reminded of the events of September 11, 2001, and their effect on the decade that followed. With photographs, infographics, special supplements and personal essays, news organizations around the world paid a great deal of attention to the tenth anniversary of the tragic attacks.

Today, however, even residents of New York City will find the front page wiped of the memory; both The New York Times and The New York Post left mention of the attacks off of A1, as Poynter observes, although both the Post and the Times feature it at the top of their websites.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-11 17:53

Today is the last day of the 2012 political conventions in the United States, which means that President Barack Obama will make a speech accepting the Democratic nomination, and news organizations will take their last mouthfuls of Niçoise salad before striking their pop-up television sets, packing up their hanging nap hammocks, and heading home.

At both the Republican Convention in Tampa last week and the Democrat Convention that is wrapping up in Charlotte today, media outlets old and new appeared to throw caution to tropical winds and pooh-pooh their financial woes as they offered “gluten-free chicken chile verde” and seared tuna to convention-goers (Huffington Post and Bloomberg), and hosted parties featuring hermit crab petting zoos and live penguins in Plexiglas (BuzzFeed).

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-06 18:30

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