WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Thu - 02.10.2014


Industry Trends

Unlike QR codes, AR uses a phone’s camera to recognize specific images (in this case, newspaper pages) and superimposes information over the camera feed. AR technology opens related links and content within its app, whereas QR codes externally connect to links on mobile web browsers. Industry analysts agree that AR has more potential for newspapers than QR codes, which have been deemed “dead” by most.

Independent+ uses iPhone, iPad and Android app Blippar to update select print stories with new information and additional multimedia features. The newspaper is also using the app to increase audience engagement by allowing readers to vote in polls related to opinion articles. The Independent said AR supplements will be available in all sections of the newspaper, according to Press Gazette.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-26 15:36

“We are flooded with so much information that we don’t really want or need,” Michael Wheeler, founder of an “a la carte journalism” startup, said in an interview with The News Hook. “I spend a lot of time on my RSS feeds saying, ‘No, I don’t want to read that.’

“People do that in traditional media,” he added. “You open up The New York Times and thumb through 5-6 pages before you pick a story to read.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-22 12:47

“If you can’t stomach the gore, don’t run the photo. Period,” wrote Orange County Register Editor Charles Apple, who first brought attention to The Daily News’ photoshopping.

The Daily News declined to comment on its editorial decision, but the question of whether to publish graphic images is one many other editors confront.

FOR GORE

Some advocate for the publication of graphic photos, arguing that text can never show the true magnitude of a horror as visuals do.

“I think TV news distances and ‘shrink-wraps’ human suffering,” writes Zeynep Tufekci, a fellow at Princeton University’s Center for Information Technology Policy. “[A]nd I believe such mode of reporting is against the public interest.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-18 12:30

In the past few weeks, the Vogue publisher announced video channels, investments in e-commerce and a clothing line. Yesterday, the Condé Nast College of Fashion & Design held its inaugural classes. Next year, GQ and Vogue bars will serve cocktails in Bangkok.

“We don’t consider ourselves only a magazine publisher,” Chief Integration Officer Drew Schutte told Nieman Lab in 2011.

“A year or so ago we took the word ‘publications’ off the building and took it off of our business cards,” he added. “There was this final commitment to the fact that we are a company that makes quality content ... and we’re going to put that on whatever medium it makes sense.”

This strategy seems to be working: last year the magazine industry saw an 8.2 percent decline in sales, but Condé Nast’s pre-tax profits were up 14 percent.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-16 15:39

It’s not just journalism hatchlings giving this business model a try: Gawker, Forbes and Complex all tie reporters’ paychecks to web traffic, Josh Sternberg of Digiday reported.

Complex’s approach shatters the wall between advertising and editorial: Editors are paid a percentage of the company’s revenue. Their salaries also take into account their sections’ pageviews and social media action, according to Sternberg.

“You want editors understanding the business side and their pains, and vice versa,” Complex CEO Rich Antoniello told Sternberg. “We try to have everyone, not only aware, but have skin in as many games as absolutely possible. When people know the totality of the business and run in the same direction, it makes it more effective.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-11 15:44

With this trend in mind, author-specific paywalls are becoming an increasingly attractive option for news organizations.

“Many readers — particularly younger ones — consume media based not on corporate brands but on individual writers that they feel a connection to, and I would argue that is becoming the norm,” paidContent’s Mathew Ingram recently wrote. “We read the New York Times as much for Tom Friedman or Nick Kristof as we do because it is the NYT.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-09 15:29

The Telegraph’s paywall, announced yesterday, will allow readers 20 free clicks a month before prompting them to subscribe to one of two models: a £1.99 per month package, which allows full access to both to the smartphone app and to the website, or the £9.99 per month package, which includes tablet access as well.

Current U.K. Telegraph subscribers will not be charged an additional amount for unlimited digital access.

The Telegraph said it decided to institute a paywall after seeing the success of its international paywall: nine out of 10 users that began a free trial ended up subscribing, a release said.

"We want to develop a closer rapport with our digital audience in the UK,” The Telegraph’s editor, Tony Gallagher, said, “and we intend to unveil a number of compelling digital products for our loyal subscribers in the months ahead."

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-27 18:38

This change will mean a major shift for many publications: Some have a “very definite strategy to reach people on the weekend” for a lean-back experience, as The Week’s president Steven Kotok explained to Ad Age

Indeed, about 30 percent of National Newspaper Association members have Saturday-specific editions, so the group has fought previous propositions to end Saturday delivery, according to MediaPost.

The Economist Group’s Managing Editor Paul Rossi noted a direct correlation between maintaining subscribers and timely delivery. About 60 percent of subscribers receive The Economist by Saturday, he told Ad Age.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-27 14:36

“This is not about getting the right women on air,” said Tim Davie, acting BBC Director General. “This is about getting the right people on air.”

Studies have shown that male experts are four times more likely to appear on radio and TV than females, but the BBC has been known for male-dominated programs including Radio 4’s Today, on which men are featured at a six to one ratio to women, The Telegraph reported. Last year Culture Secretary Ed Vaizey likened the program a “terrible cliched locker room.”

In fact, on July 5, 2011, “you had to wait from 6.15 am until 8.20 am to hear the one female contributor who appeared alongside the 27 male contributors on programme,” Kira Cochrane reported. She found that 83.5 percent of Today’s contributors were male at the time of her study in 2011.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-26 18:06

The Telegraph

Earlier this month The Telegraph announced intentions to cut 80 positions as the newspaper moved to share resources with its Sunday operation, The Guardian reported. These layoffs signify a 14 percent reduction in staff, which previously consisted of 550 editorial workers. The redundancies will be met with 50 new “digitally-focused” jobs, resulting in a net loss of about 5 percent. Most of the job losses will come from The Sunday Telegraph rather than the weekday operation.

Chief Executive Murdoch MacLennan said the merger shows the newspaper’s digital-first ambitions, solidified with an £8 million investment “to complete our transition to a digital business,” according to The Guardian.

The Independent

In February Managing Director Andrew Mullins declared the Levedev titles’ intentions “to become one of the very first truly integrated multimedia companies, publishing continuously on print, TV and other digital platforms.” He said that its soon-to-be-launched local TV channel London Live will share journalistic resources with other titles, according to MediaGuardian.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-26 14:06

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Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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