WAN-IFRA

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Mon - 23.10.2017


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In the age of social media, scoops can last just a matter of seconds. As New York Times interactive editor Aron Pilhofer noted in a session on moving towards smarter, better online content, gone are the days when competitors would have to wait 24 hours to take your scoop. Now, he said, it’s almost irrelevant to be first, and the value of being right outweighs the value of being first by magnitudes.

It’s not just traditional news organizations who feel this way. Adam Baker, founder of citizen journalism site Blottr, said that his team can’t afford to get anything wrong, because they don’t have the reputation of an established brand.

Most normal people don’t even know who broke a story, said Anthony De Rosa, Reuters’ social media editor, in a session on citizen journalism. Eric Carvin, social media editor at the Associated Press, suggested that scoops are becoming less relevant, with great investigative pieces becoming more important. Pilhofer made a similar point, commenting that any blog could cut and summarise a breaking news article, but a piece like Snowfall will always be unique to The Times.

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-04-29 18:26

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In the aftermath of the double bombing of the Boston Marathon, which killed three people and injured more than 170 others, false information has clouded the reports of the Boston Marathon bombing. With the 24-hour news cycle and social media disseminating information faster than journalists can analyze it, the urge to report quickly has in some cases overtaken the need to report correctly.

Hours earlier, trusted news sources such as the AP, Reuters, CNN, Fox News and the Boston Globe had reported that the FBI had identified a sole suspect. The outlets said that the suspect was in custody, only having to retract their statements after the Boston Police department set the record straight.

“BREAKING: Law enforcement official: Arrest imminent in Boston Marathon bombing, suspect to be brought to court,” tweeted the AP.

CNN’s John King told viewers that a suspect had been identified and had been arrested; the network later released a statement, Politico reported, saying “CNN had three credible sources on both local and federal levels. Based on this information we reported our findings. As soon as our sources came to us with new information we adjusted our reporting.”

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Author

Allison DeAngelis

Date

2013-04-18 18:07

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Kathleen Carroll, AP Senior Vice President, announced on Tuesday that the term ‘illegal immigrant’ would not be used anymore, calling it a "label." She noted that the AP prefers to label "behavior" rather than "people," writing that instead of using the term "schizophrenic," the AP now prefers saying that one is "diagnosed with schizophrenia." The new AP entry still categorizes illegal immigration, but recommends to avoid using "undocumented immigrant" or an alternative descriptor like "unauthorized" in place of "illegal immigrant."

"Acceptable variations include living in or entering a country illegally or without legal permission," the AP's StyleBook suggests.

The San Antonio Express-News stopped using the term five years ago, and in 2010, the paper stopped using “immigrant” with a modifier altogether, Poynter reported. Rather, the paper would state that somebody had entered the US illegally, and cite a source.

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Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-04-04 15:06

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Hailed by Black as a "hammer blow to investigative journalism", the Charter has also fallen under attack from former Guardian editor, Peter Preston, who recently expressed his lack of faith in its ability to make any real difference to the issue of press accountability as it stands today.

So just why exactly has the Charter been condemned by journalists and news executives as an unacceptable resolution to the on-going dilemma of press regulation in the UK, aside from the fact that it is underpinned by law, and therefore implies a degree of government control over the press? Will it actually change anything? Is it a system that is any more likely to hold the press to account than they have been already?

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Author

Emily Moore

Date

2013-04-03 12:11

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Maintaining high ethical standards and high quality journalism is therefore ever more of a challenge, but it is as essential as ever that news organisations embrace this. “For journalism to stay relevant in the future, ethics has to be at the centre,” said Amadou Mahta Ba, CEO of the African Media Initiative.

Added Larry Kilman, Deputy CEO of WAN-IFRA, “The expectation of credibility is part of the DNA of traditional media.”

High ethical standards need to run through the entire news organisation, not just the journalists on the ground. “If you have corrupt relations at a management level, the whole media structure becomes corroded,” said White, pointing to the phone-hacking scandal in the UK which led to the closure of The News of the World and prompted the Leveson Inquiry. The problem here, he stressed, wasn’t just unethical practices by individual reporters, but was rooted in the behaviour of those at the top.

Mahta Ba echoed the idea that we need “ethics at the highest echelons of media,” pointing out that journalists usually have a code of ethics and conduct, but CEOs don’t have any kind of ethical framework through which they work. “Fish start rotting from the head,” he added.

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-02-27 14:04

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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