WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Fri - 29.08.2014


digital journalism

Unlike QR codes, AR uses a phone’s camera to recognize specific images (in this case, newspaper pages) and superimposes information over the camera feed. AR technology opens related links and content within its app, whereas QR codes externally connect to links on mobile web browsers. Industry analysts agree that AR has more potential for newspapers than QR codes, which have been deemed “dead” by most.

Independent+ uses iPhone, iPad and Android app Blippar to update select print stories with new information and additional multimedia features. The newspaper is also using the app to increase audience engagement by allowing readers to vote in polls related to opinion articles. The Independent said AR supplements will be available in all sections of the newspaper, according to Press Gazette.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-26 15:36

"We have to change the perception of the New York Times as not only a place to read about important stories of the day and interesting topics, but also a place to watch,” Denise Warren, executive vice president of NYT’s Digital Products and Services Group, told Journalism.co.uk.

Many of the Times’ videos were already available for free on YouTube and Hulu, an inconsistency that needed to be addressed, Warren told paidContent. And thanks to sponsorship by Acura and Microsoft, videos are now freely accessible on all of the Times’ platforms, including its mobile apps, according to a release.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-24 15:19

The group currently aggregates news through its Your Anon News Twitter and Tumblr feeds, but the new website will feature original reporting by citizen journalists. It is unclear whether contributors will be paid.

“We’ll provide feeds for citizen journalists who livestream events as they are taking place, instead of the 10-second sound bites provided by the corporate media,” a Your Anon News release says.

The new site will continue YAN's mission to avoid “the constraints placed upon mainstream media outlets” and be a news source free of “political and celebrity gossip."

The site “could be like nothing the Internet has ever seen before,” The Next Web’s Nick Summers wrote. But despite YAN’s mission to avoid the troubles that riddle mainstream media, it will likely face unique issues.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-18 17:44

Reporters Lisa Song, Elizabeth McGowan and David Hasemyer’s seven-month investigation into the 2010 Kalamazoo oil spill revealed details that preceded national reports by weeks, despite InsideClimate News’ limited funding. Founder and Publisher David Sassoon estimated, salaries included, InsideClimate News spent only 10 percent of what a major newsroom would have budgeted for a similar investigation, according to Forbes.

With reporters and contributors now scattered across the globe, in Istanbul, New Delhi, Boston and San Diego, the startup has come a long way from its original two-person staff. But this recognition could thrust it even further forward: Sassoon told Forbes he envisions a staff of around 25 and a newsroom in New York.

“I think it’s a game changer,” Sassoon said of the award. “I think the Pulitzer Committee probably knew that. We earned the award. ... But I think they would understand how validation from them, the top honor in journalism, would make a big difference to us as a tiny startup.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-17 13:42

It’s not just journalism hatchlings giving this business model a try: Gawker, Forbes and Complex all tie reporters’ paychecks to web traffic, Josh Sternberg of Digiday reported.

Complex’s approach shatters the wall between advertising and editorial: Editors are paid a percentage of the company’s revenue. Their salaries also take into account their sections’ pageviews and social media action, according to Sternberg.

“You want editors understanding the business side and their pains, and vice versa,” Complex CEO Rich Antoniello told Sternberg. “We try to have everyone, not only aware, but have skin in as many games as absolutely possible. When people know the totality of the business and run in the same direction, it makes it more effective.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-11 15:44

With this trend in mind, author-specific paywalls are becoming an increasingly attractive option for news organizations.

“Many readers — particularly younger ones — consume media based not on corporate brands but on individual writers that they feel a connection to, and I would argue that is becoming the norm,” paidContent’s Mathew Ingram recently wrote. “We read the New York Times as much for Tom Friedman or Nick Kristof as we do because it is the NYT.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-09 15:29

Creator Rob Wijnberg told The Editor's Weblog he originally thought De Correspondent had a 50 percent chance of meeting its goal of 15,000 members. But as of Thursday, more than 17,000 people have shelled out €60 for an annual subscription to the news site, set to launch in September. According to the site, 48 members have additionally donated €1,000 or more to fund the project.

“We were overwhelmed, especially by how fast it was and especially by how much enthusiasm people showed for the initiative,” Wijnberg said. “People really mailed us lots of letters and tweets and everything saying that ‘I’m so glad you started this.’ We didn’t expect that.”

While this sort of drive is unusual, it is not unprecedented. Several years ago Italian newspaper Il Fatto Quotidiano similarly preemptively fundraised, and collected €5 million from 30,000 advance subscribers in 3 months.

De Correspondent has been in the works since Wijnberg quit his job as editor of Dutch national newspaper NRC Next in September. He said he noticed how people are “hounded by news” — often “struck by the same news from all different directions.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-04 17:48

The Telegraph

Earlier this month The Telegraph announced intentions to cut 80 positions as the newspaper moved to share resources with its Sunday operation, The Guardian reported. These layoffs signify a 14 percent reduction in staff, which previously consisted of 550 editorial workers. The redundancies will be met with 50 new “digitally-focused” jobs, resulting in a net loss of about 5 percent. Most of the job losses will come from The Sunday Telegraph rather than the weekday operation.

Chief Executive Murdoch MacLennan said the merger shows the newspaper’s digital-first ambitions, solidified with an £8 million investment “to complete our transition to a digital business,” according to The Guardian.

The Independent

In February Managing Director Andrew Mullins declared the Levedev titles’ intentions “to become one of the very first truly integrated multimedia companies, publishing continuously on print, TV and other digital platforms.” He said that its soon-to-be-launched local TV channel London Live will share journalistic resources with other titles, according to MediaGuardian.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-26 14:06

WaPo Executive Editor Marty Baron’s assurance to Poynter that “some posts can be as short as a sentence or as simple as a link” did not silence the Twittersphere’s response:  “At least WaPo is being open with its intention to kill someone,” Kissing Suzy Kolber blog editor Mike Tunison tweetedDerek Thompson, senior editor of The Atlanticwrote, “nobody has 12 smart things to say a day, it’s an absurd ask!”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-21 18:15

The paywall, set to take effect this summer, will allow each visitor 20 complementary page views per month, excluding the home page and classifieds section. The newspaper hopes to maintain most of its 17 million monthly unique visitors.

Such a metered model has proven successful for other newspapers including The New York Times, which Columbia Journalism Review said generates $100 million through digital subscriptions.

In addition to not counting clicks from search engines and social media, the paywall will allow unlimited access from schools, government and military workplaces, notable as more than 20 percent of District of Columbia residents are federal employees, according to Forbes. But Don Graham, chairman and CEO of The Washington Post Co., has previously noted that locals provide less than 10 percent of the newspaper’s online traffic. This statistic made him previously wary of charging for online access, as he predicted that bundling digital subscriptions with print wouldn’t be as successful for The Post as for other papers.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-19 14:21

Syndicate content

Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


© 2013 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation